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Nieuport 20

Nieuport 20


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Nieuport 20

The Nieuport 20 was a variant of the Nieuport 12 two-seater that was produced in small numbers for the RFC late in 1916. The standard Nieuport 12 was powered by a Clerget engine, but in British service some of these aircraft had been re-engined with an 110hp Le Rhône engine. By the summer of 1916 the RFC wanted more of these aircraft, and the French agreed to provide thirty newly built Le Rhône powered aircraft, with the official designation of the Nieuport 20.

The Nieuport 20 shared the standard layout of most Nieuport biplanes of this period, with sesquiplane wings (the lower wing having almost the same span as the upper, but half the length), and a flat sided fuselage.

The first two of these aircraft were delivered on 15 September 1916, but by this point the British were more interested in the single-seat Nieuport 17. In late October the French agreed that ten of the Nieuport 20s could be delivered as Nieuport 17s instead, and eventually only 21 of the two-seat aircraft were delivered.

The Nieuport 20 saw service on the Western Front with No.1 Squadron, the first to get the type, and with No.46 Squadron, where they operated alongside the Nieuport 12 before both types were replaced by the Sopwith Pup in April 1917. It was also used by the home-based No.39 Squadron for a couple of months in mid-1916, alongside a range of other types.

Engine: Le Rhône 9Jb
Power: 110hp
Crew: 2
Span: 29ft 6in
Length: 22ft 11.5in
Height: 9ft 10.25in
Empty weight: 999lb
Maximum take-off weight: 1,658lb
Max speed: 98mph at sea level
Climb Rate: 12.05min to 6,560ft

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


Bill Bettis, founder of the iconic aviation themed Nieuport 17 restaurant, has died

Wilbur “Bill” Bettis (standing slightly arched back with hands on his lower back) and his crew at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, during patrol duties in 1955. He was a lieutenant junior grade (Lt. j.g.) at the time. (Photo courtesy Dick Hallion)

Nieuport 17 in Tustin before it closed. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Wilbur “Bill” Bettis was a regular at Benjies diner in Santa Ana. Photo taken in 2013, two years before Nieuport 17 closed. (Photo provided by Dick Hallion)

A statue of Charles Lindbergh sat in the foyer of Nieuport 17 in Tustin. Longtime friend of Bill Bettis, Dick Hallion bought the bust in a recent auction. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Left to right: Admiral Gordon Smith, Richard “Dick” Hallion and Wilbur “Bill” Bettis at Nieuport 17. “Gordon Smith was a highly distinguished naval aviator who later was a Vice President of Lockheed up in Ontario,” Hallion said. (Photo provided by Dick Hallion)

A Martin P5M-2 Marlin patrol seaplane of USN patrol squadron VP-40, the kind of airplane Wilbur Bettis flew while a Navy pilot for 6 years in the 1950s. He served after the Korean War he patrolled for enemy submarines or any hostile activity. “What Wilbur did, to his mind, was so meaningful, that it just really gave him a tremendous sense of mission,” longtime friend Dick Hallion said. (Photo provided by Dick Hallion)

Nieuport 17 in Tustin was one of the last of Orange County’s classic fine dining institutions. It closed in 2015. Bill Bettis opened the restaurant in 1969. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Kim Leahy was one of many Nieuport 17 employees who worked for the restaurant for more than 20 years. The restaurant was stocked to the hilt with decor that celebrates aviation over the years. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

A bust of Charles Lindbergh, which used to be in the foyer of Nieuport 17. Longtime friend Richard “Dick” Hallion purchased the piece at auction after Bettis’ death. Lindbergh was the first aviator to make a solo flight across the North Atlantic in May 1927. (Photo provided by Dick Hallion)

Nieuport 17 in Tustin is the last of Orange County’s classic fine dining institution. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

The walls of Nieuport 17 in Tustin were dedicated to aviation artwork, a passion for owner Bill Bettis. Bettis passed away in March. – ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Day manager Marsha Lavoie, of Lakewood, has worked at Nieuport 17 for 27 years. The restaurant closed two years ago. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Nieuport 17 in Tustin is the last of Orange County’s classic fine dining institution. ANA VENEGAS, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Wilbur Bettis, who founded the landmark Tustin restaurant Nieuport 17, has died. He was 83.

Bettis died March 1 from complications resulting from heart surgery. A private memorial is being held later this month to honor Bettis, who lived in Santa Ana for more than 40 years.

Friends and family described him as the ultimate host with a passion for three things: the Navy, fine cuisine and his collies, all named Jerry. (Each time one passed, he named the next one the same name.)

At Nieuport 17, Bettis blended two of his three loves. The white tablecloth restaurant, founded in 1969 in Santa Ana, offered a five-star experience in a setting devoted to aviation. In his early 20s, Bettis served as a Navy carrier pilot for six years.

“He loved to fly,” said his sister, Trish Wimbrow-Dwyer of Aliso Viejo.

Though his time as an airman was short, the impact on Bettis would last a lifetime.

The family of his first wife was in the restaurant business. With a passion for food (he collected menus from all over the world), he learned the business quickly while living in Texas. When he relocated to Southern California, he opened Nieuport 17. It would become a restaurant known for its wall-to-wall collection of military memorabilia including signed autographs from the Blue Angels flying squadron.

Nieuport 17, which later relocated to Tustin, became a gathering spot for a then-thriving aerospace industry in Orange County. Top engineers, aircraft designers and executives working for Howard Hughes, Douglas Aircraft, Rockwell and Boeing dined at the restaurant.

They gathered at the bar after work for an Old Fashioned, sealed deals at lunch over three martinis and toasted special occasions while dining on Nieuport 17’s famed dishes including beef Wellington.

”We closed the restaurant down on Friday and Saturday nights,” said long time friend Richard Hallion.

Hallion met Bettis after dining at the original location on 17th Street in Santa Ana in the early 1980s. As the former curator at the National Air and Space Museum at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., Hallion was awestruck by Bettis’ collection.

He had busts of famous aviators, artwork from renowned aviation artist R.G. Smith and 3-D models of fighter planes. (Nieuport 17 is named after a World War I French sesquiplane.)

“I walked in and I was just blown away,” Hallion said.

Not only was the restaurant “crammed” with great military material, but it was also “jam packed with people,” said Hallion, who now lives in Florida.

“Given the tremendous role that California had in making aerospace a revolution, there really wasn’t much there in terms of aviation museums or heritage,” he said.

“Wilbur’s Nieuport 17 served that function for 40 years,” Hallion said.

Bettis was proud of the culture he created and relished hosting the men and women who served his country. When the Navy’s Blue Angels performed at the El Toro Marine base’s annual air show, Bettis hosted them at dinner. Bettis displayed each team proudly on the walls of the restaurant.

“Bill’s restaurant was the closest the Blue Angels came to having their own team museum as it was filled with their memorabilia, including framed (and mostly signed) photos of the team at various times through the years, back to 1946,” Hallion said.

In a 2015 Register interview before Nieuport 17 closed, Bettis recalled those special years. He said Glenn Odekirk, who built the Spruce Goose, drew a crowd of diners with his stories about Howard Hughes.

“It was a meeting place for all those people,” Bettis said in 2015. “It was almost like a club.”

He even brokered many rare meetups including hosting former German and American fighter pilots at the same table.

Ultimately, bonds were created by generations of military families who dined on classic dishes — swordfish, Sunday fried chicken (his mom’s recipe), the shrimp and avocado sandwich, and the famed fried eggplant (breaded in Ritz and Goldfish crackers).

“It spoke to a different era of dining in California,” Hallion said.

Wimbrow-Dwyer said Nieuport 17 enjoyed many successful years. “I think he would have kept doing it until he fell over,” she said.

But the restaurant eventually hit hard times as a new generation of diners began favoring contemporary venues like gastropubs and fine dining restaurants with no dress code.

Several years ago Bettis sold a majority stake of Nieuport 17 to Cameron Irons, whose family had dined at the restaurant for years. Irons tried to revive it with a modern menu, pop-up dinners with haute guest chefs and weekly tasting menus.

But the battle proved too tough. The newcomers didn’t come, and the older loyalists balked at the modern menu.

In early 2015, Irons decided to close Nieuport 17.

“It breaks my heart,” Bettis told the Register at the time.

At home, Bettis found comfort over the years with his beloved collies. Though Nieuport 17 closed, he maintained ownership of the military memorabilia that he’d collected throughout the years. His home also was a shrine to aviation history.

Several weeks ago, dozens of artwork, photographs and busts were sold at auction. Hallion bought a few pieces. Others landed in the Smithsonian.

“They have found homes in new places with people who loved him,” Wimbrow-Dwyer said.

Bettis is survived by daughter Lisa Marquis of Palm Sprints, and another sister, Marianne Segall of Wyoming.


Nieuport 20 - History



























1921 Chronology of Aviation History
Major Aviation Events

1921 Aviation Records

Speed: (France), 205.22-mph, Joseph Sadi-Lecointe, Nieuport-Delage 29, 26 September 1921.

Distance:(UK), 1,884-miles, Alcock and Brown, Vickers Vimy, 15 June 1919.

Altitude:(USA), 34,610-feet, Roland Rohlfs, Curtiss Wasp, 18 September 1919.

Weight:(Italy), 57,319-lbs, SAI Caproni, Caproni Ca 60.

Engine Power: (France), 838-hp, Marcel Riffard, Breguet-Bagatti 32.

1921 &mdash Bessie Coleman attends flying school in France and became the first licensed African-American female pilot.

1921 &mdash Mexicana de Aviacion begins service.

January 1921

February 1921

February 24 &mdash First flight of the Douglas Cloudster.

April &mdash First flight of the Fairey Pintail.

April 19 &mdash First flight of the Short Cromarty flying boat.

May &mdash First flight of the Boeing GA-1.

June &mdash Boeing wins a $1,448,000 contract to build 200 Thomas-Morse MB-3 fighters for the US Army, allowing the company to abandon furniture-making.

June 8 &mdash the US Army carries out the first experiments in cabin pressurization, using a de Havilland DH.4.

June 13 &mdash the US Army and Navy begin trials in Chesapeake Bay to test the effectiveness of aircraft in attacking ships. The captured German destroyer G-102, light cruiser Frankfurt and battleship Ostfriesland will all be successfully sunk by aerial bombing.

June 16 &mdash First flight of the Blériot-SPAD S.46.

June 21 &mdash First flight of the Bristol Ten-Seater.

July &mdash Douglas Aircraft Company founded.

July 16 &mdash First flight of the Avro 552.

August 1921

August 11 &mdash Schneider Trophy race flown at Venice, Italy. In an all-Italian field, Giovanni De Briganti won the race in a Macchi M-7. Speed 189.7 km/h (117.9 mph).

August 24 &mdash British Airship R-38 breaks up over Hull, Yorkshire during trials, killing 44 people.

September 1921

September 19 &mdash the first regular scheduled airline service in Latin America commences, with Colombian airline SCADTA operating float-equipped Junkers F.13s between Barranquilla and Girandot.

October 1921

October &mdash The RAF takes over from the British Army in assuming policing duties in Iraq.

October 15 &mdash the Spanish airline Compania Española de Trafico Aereo is established &mdash it will eventually form part of Iberia Airlines.

November 1921

November &mdash The 6th Salon d'Aeronautique is held in Paris. The Breguet 19 is unveiled.

November 5 &mdash Curtiss test pilot Bert Acosta wins the Pulitzer Trophy in a Curtiss CR-2 and establishes a new closed-circuit airspeed record of 284.36 km/h (176.7 mph).

December 1921

December 5 &mdash The first regular air services in Australia commence, with West Australian Airways.

Works Cited

  1. Gunston, Bill, et al. Chronicle of Aviation. Liberty, Missouri: JL Publishing Inc., 1992. 14-17.
  2. Parrish, Wayne W. (Publisher). "United States Chronology". 1962 Aerospace Yearbook, Forty-Third Annual Edition. Washington, DC: American Aviation Publications, Inc., 1962, 446-469.
  3. Wikipedia, 1921 in aviation.
  4. Shupek, John (photos and card images), The Skytamer Archive. Skytamer.com, Whittier, CA.

Copyright © 1998-2018 (Our 20 th Year) Skytamer Images, Whittier, California
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


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NIEUPORT MEMORIAL

Nieuport (now Nieuwpoort) is a town in the Province of West Flanders on the south-west side of the River Yser, 3 kilometres from the sea. The Nieuport Memorial is on a site where the road to Lombardsijde joins the road from Nieuport dock. It is located partly along the "Sluizenring" and partly along the "Westendelaan". The Memorial takes the form of a pylon of Euville stone, 8 metres high, surrounded by a bronze band on which are cast the names of the casualties commemorated. It stands on a triangular paved platform, and at each corner of the triangle is the recumbent figure of a lion facing outwards.

Visiting information

The names on the memorial are recorded by Regiment, then by Rank and then alphabetically.

History information

The Nieuport Memorial commemorates 552 British officers and men who were killed in Allied operations on the Belgian coast during the First World War and have no known grave. Twenty of those commemorated served with the Royal Naval Division and were killed or mortally wounded during the siege of Antwerp in October 1914. Almost all of the remainder fell in heavy fighting in the region of Nieuport in the summer of 1917. The memorial is constructed of Euville limestone and stands eight metres high. It was designed by William Bryce Binnie, an Imperial War Graves Commission architect who served with The Black Watch during the war and was twice decorated for bravery. The lions standing at each point of the triangular platform were designed by Charles Sergeant Jagger, a celebrated British sculptor and decorated veteran of the Western Front. The memorial was officially unveiled by Sir George Macdonogh in July 1928.

British Operations on the Belgian Coast

The armies of the German Empire invaded Belgium on 4 August 1914. Within three weeks the fortified cities of Liege and Namur were in German hands and the Belgian forces had retreated to Antwerp, which was well defended and ringed by a series of forts. To begin with, the German First Army under General von Kluck bypassed the city and moved south-west toward the Franco-Belgian border. Yet on September 28, after weeks of heavy fighting in northern France, German artillery batteries began to shell the outer forts from the south-east. The accuracy of the German long-range guns had a devastating effect on the defences of the outer forts, and by the beginning of October the German infantry was slowly closing in on the city.

Fearing that the fall of Antwerp would expose the channel ports and leave Britain vulnerable to attack, the British deployed the newly formed Royal Naval Division to assist their Belgian allies in defending the city. The first British reinforcements, a brigade of Royal Marines, arrived at Antwerp on 4 October and relieved the 21st Belgian Regiment. On the following day the German forces crossed the river Nethe at Lier, 20 kilometres south of Antwerp. Two more British naval brigades arrived at Antwerp early on 6 October, yet while their arrival lifted the morale of the soldiers and civilians in the city, they could do little to alter the strategic position of the Belgian garrison, which was now critical. On the night of 6 October, the Belgian fortress troops under General Paris retired to the inner forts on the outskirts of the city, and over the course of the next day the German forces crossed the river Scheldt and began to shell the streets and houses of Antwerp. By 8 October, the Belgian Field Army had evacuated the city, which was now defended by mixed units of Belgian and British troops. The first German troops entered the city, following heavy shelling, on 9 October and the siege was at an end.

British units did not return to this sector of the Western Front until June 1917, when the 32nd Division relieved French troops stationed at Nieuport in preparation for planned Allied landings on German-held territory along the Belgian coast. German marines launched a pre-emptive attack against the British forces on the river Yser in July and the landings, codenamed ‘Operation Hush’, never took place. Over 260 men commemorated on the Nieuport Memorial were killed or mortally wounded during heavy fighting with units of the German Marine-Korps Flandern on July 10 1917.


5. Werner Voss


The Red Baron is remembered as Germany’s king of the skies during World War I, but Werner Voss may have been his closest competitor. Voss entered the war in 1914 at the age of 17, and served as a cavalryman before transferring to the air service and being placed in the same squadron as the Baron. He quickly won fame for his acrobatic flying style and deadly accuracy in combat, eventually amassing a total of 48 aerial victories and winning the “Pour le Merite,” Germany’s highest military honor during World War I. The young airman had a flair for the dramatic, and routinely landed next to his downed adversaries’ planes to claim a souvenir from the wreckage. When his defeated enemies were captured alive, Voss would sometimes pay them a visit to drop off some cigars or even an autographed photo of himself.

Voss is most famous for his final flight on September 23, 1917. In what is often called the greatest dogfight of the war, he singlehandedly engaged seven British pilots𠅊ll of them experienced aces—over Belgium. Though severely outnumbered, Voss spent a full ten minutes flying circles around his opponents and dancing between machine gun tracers, eventually forcing three of the British planes out of the fight before finally being shot down and killed. James McCudden, one of the British pilots, would later describe the 20-year-old Voss as “the bravest German airman whom it has been my privilege to see fight.”


Texas Pushes to Obscure the State’s History of Slavery and Racism

Texas is awash in bills aimed at fending off critical examinations of the state’s past.

Every morning, schoolchildren in Texas recite an oath to their state that includes the words, “I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God.”

Now, a flurry of proposed measures that could soon become law would promote even greater loyalty to Texas in the state’s classrooms and public spaces, as Republican lawmakers try to reframe Texas history lessons and play down references to slavery and anti-Mexican discrimination that are part of the state’s founding.

The proposals in Texas, a state that influences school curriculums around the country through its huge textbook market, amount to some of the most aggressive efforts to control the teaching of American history. And they come as nearly a dozen other Republican-led states seek to ban or limit how the role of slavery and pervasive effects of racism can be taught.

Idaho was the first state to sign into law a measure that would withhold funding from schools that teach such lessons. And lawmakers in Louisiana, New Hampshire and Tennessee have introduced bills that would ban teaching about the enduring legacies of slavery and segregationist laws, or that any state or the country is inherently racist or sexist.

“The idea that history is a project that’s decided in the political arena is a recipe for disaster,” said Raul Ramos, a historian at the University of Houston who specializes in the American West.

Some of the positioning is politics as usual in Texas, where activists have long organized to imbue textbooks with conservative leanings. An especially active Republican-controlled legislative session has advanced hard-line measures from a host of new voting restrictions to a ban on abortions after six weeks of pregnancy.

But the Texas history measures have alarmed educators, historians and activists who said they largely ignore the role of slavery and campaigns of anti-Mexican violence and would fail to educate a generation of students growing up in a state undergoing huge demographic shifts.

One measure that recently passed the Texas House, largely along party lines, would limit teacher-led discussions of current events prohibit course credit for political activism or lobbying, which could include students who volunteer for civil rights groups and ban teaching of The 1619 Project, an initiative by The New York Times that says it aims to reframe U.S. history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans at the center of the national narrative.

The bill would also limit how teachers in Texas classrooms can discuss the ways in which racism influenced the legal system in the state, long a segregationist bastion, and the rest of the country. Another bill that sailed through the Texas House would create a committee to “promote patriotic education” about the state’s secession from Mexico in 1836, largely by men who were fighting to expand slavery. And a third bill would block exhibits at San Antonio’s Alamo complex from explaining that major figures in the Texas Revolution were slave owners.

Mr. Ramos questioned how the Texas Revolution, a six-month rebellion that concluded in the spring of 1836, could be associated with patriotism and freedom when the state’s new Constitution explicitly legalized slavery seven years after Mexico had abolished it.

“How do you have freedom when you have slavery?” Mr. Ramos asked. “Eighteen thirty-six values would have enslaved African-Americans in perpetuity.”

The quarreling over the proposed legislation is testing the limits of Texas exceptionalism, with some questioning whether a broad sense of pride among residents should mean glossing over some of the state’s most painful chapters.


Nieuport 20 - History

Niepoort has been an independent family business since 1842. The Niepoort lodges are located in the historical center of Vila Nova de Gaia a magical place where Portwines are aged in old casks, bottles or demijohns.

The Muscat variety is for Dirk Niepoort one of the great varieties of the world.

Portugal has a long tradition of producing Moscatel, especially in the regions

of Setubal and Douro – Favaios - where the variety is Moscatel Petit Grains.

At Niepoort the records show that the production of Moscatel began around the 1920s.

Although we had a long tradition of producing it, for bureaucratic

reasons it slowly disappeared.

In 2000, we decided to recover Moscatel. The Niepoort style is a full-bodied

wine with a good structure and high acidity level to balance the sugar content

and guaranty a fresh wine.

White Port is made from white grapes: Malvasia, Viosinho and Gouveio. The juice is fermented as a white wine until the fermentation is stopped by the addition of pure grape brandy. After spending one year in large wood vats the wine is transferred to Casks (550 liter oak barrels). It is then aged in wood until at least 3 years before bottling. Deep gold, with nuts and hints of fruit fresh aroma and half sweet taste. Serve chilled as an aperitif or with desserts or even by itself.

Niepoort Dry White is made in the tradicional style with long skin maceration. The final blend includes different wines aged in oak casks with an average of 3,5 years. Golden, with nuts and almonds aroma and a fresh concentrated finish. Great when served chilled as an aperitif or with tonic water, ice and a slice of lemon or lemon peel.

An individual and distinct White Port, made for the first time by Niepoort as a result of the exceptional quality of a few parcels of old White Ports. Presents a classic style due to the long oxidative ageing process and the extended skin maceration. Gold, with dry fruits (orange peel, dry figs and nuts) aroma. Fine and balanced mouth, with acidity balancing its sweet character.

Serve chilled as an aperitif, with dessert or even on its own at the end of a meal.

The artist Regina Pessoa, inspired by Lewis Carrol, is the arquitect of NiePOoRTland: the magical place where the identical twins “Ruby Dum” and “Tawny Dee” live with all different characters from Alice in Wonderland. The "White Rabbit" was always a very special character and in 2013 gains its own label with “Rabbit Dry White”. The storyboard is finally complete….

With time, Ruby Dum retains its youthful, strong character, dominated by red cherries and plums with great freshness from ageing in large wooden vats in the cool cellars of Vila Nova de Gaia. Deep red, with fresh and ripe fruity aroma, easy drinking. Great with chocolate desserts or soft cheese.

During the ageing process Tawny Dee acquires great wisdom and subtleness through ageing in small old oak casks, exhibiting discrete characters of dried stone fruits. Fantastisc with nuts based desserts, fruit pies or the portuguese "Leite Creme queimado".

Rabbit Dry White is made in the tradicional style with long skin maceration. The final blend includes different wines aged in oak casks with an average of 3,5 years. Gold, with nuts and almonds aroma and a fresh concentrated finish. Great when served chilled as an aperitif or with tonic water, ice and a slice of lemon or lemon peel.

Max and Moritz are two naughty boys from Wilhelm Busch stories. The two brothers are the perfect tool to explain the Niepoort world of Port Wine. Max, fresh and fruity and Moritz, smooth and elegant, are The Two Niepoort Fabulous Ports.

Moritz spends most of its time ageing in barrels. Through a slow oxidation process over 7 years, is an elegant Port with a subtle expression, light colour and a range of flavours and aromas that are based on red fruit tones. Moritz is one of the Tawnies in the Tawny range of Ports: Tawny, Tawny with Age Indication and Colheita. A good match with cheeses and chocolate based desserts. It can also be drunk as an aperitif.

Max ages an average of 3 years in large wooden barrels. Great with chocolate desserts (specially bitter chocolate) or Cheddar, Gouda and Brie cheese.

The imaginary world of Wilhelm Busch has long crossed our world of wines. We try to innovate, keeping the tradition and in this process all the details are important. The unlucky and gloomy crow from the fable “Hans Huckebein”, created by Wilhem Busch himself, illustrates the Fabelhaft Port Wines.

The Fabelhaft Ruby, a young, vigorous and fresh Port Wine, is distinguished by the red capsule, while the Fabelhaft Tawny, subtle, elegant and expressive, finds its identity in the orange capsule.

With Fabelhaft Ruby and Tawny the doors to the magical and wonderful world of Port Wines are opened. Discover it!

The Niepoort philosophy has been, for the last decades, to innovate, diversify, break taboos, maintaining tradition. Parallel to the redesign of The Senior Tawny, where we used the most traditional format of bottle and a moustache to emphasis the seniority, we redesigned the Junior Tinto based on the concept of a young, fresh and contemporary wine.

The Junior Ruby undergoes an early filling, and spends the rest of its time in the bottle, where it is protected against outside influences. Through this process, its youthfulness, dark colour, freshness and dark fruit aromas and flavours are optimally maintained. Goes well with cheese, all kinds of chocolate and is perfect with pepper steak.

Regarding the Senior Tawny wine, it spends most of its time ageing in small barrels in the Niepoort lodge in Vila Nova de Gaia. The small barrels enable a soft and light contact with air through the pores of the wood, which results in a slow oxidation process over the years. Ideal with dry fruits, apple pie, the portuguese "Leite Creme" or patê.

At Niepoort we believe that the colour of the Port should be inspired by the "ruby stone". Ruby ages an average of 3 years. The grapes come from old vineyards in Cima Corgo region of Douro Valley. The wine ages in large wooden casks at Niepoort cellars, in Vila Nova de Gaia. Niepoort Ruby is fresh, young and fruity. An expressive Port with great character. Ruby keeps well for several years, although the wine will not improve with age. No decanting is necessary since the wine contains no sediment. Serve after a meal, by itself or with soft cheese.

Niepoort Ruby Reserve aims to be an accessible and easy drinking wine, while at the same time, retaining a high level of quality. A modern youthful style, resulting from a careful selection of very special wines aged for 3 to 4 years. Bright red in colour, exhibiting a very attractive aroma, with notes of ripe red fruit. Goes well with chocolate based desserts, soft cheese or by itself.

Late Bottled Vintage Port is from a single year. The wine ages 4-6 years in old oak casks (opposed to Vintage that ages 2-3). LBV fills the gap between the Rubies and the Vintage Ports since a Ruby Port should be drunk quite young and a great Vintage Port may need 15 to 20 years to really open up and show its splendour. This led to the idea in the 1960s to age the wine 4 to 6 years in large casks before bottling it, thereby producing a wine with the style of a Vintage Port with its deep colour and concentration of fruit, but with a more mature character caused by the longer ageing in wood. Late Bottled Vintage is the perfect Port to accompany chocolate desserts, specially bitter chocolate or a pepper steak.

This Crusted Port very much complements the well renowned Vintage and Late Bottled Vintage in the Niepoort range. Traditionally, Crusted Port is selected from wines of Vintage quality, from two or three harvests, which undergo no fining or filtration prior to bottling and are only released three years after bottling.

As the name suggests, Crusted Port, with time, will throw a natural deposit in bottle, and that’s why it is important to decant before serving. Niepoort Crusted is most appealing in its youth but will also benefit from several years ageing in bottle, for which the wines should be stored lying down.

This Bioma Crusted Port (Bottled 2014) is a further step up (if that’s even possible!) from the Niepoort Crusted Port. Traditionally, Crusted Port is selected from wines of Vintage quality, from two or three harvests, undergoes no fining or filtration, and is released three years after bottling. The origins of the Bioma Crusted (Bottled 2014) place this Port in a different league – the grapes stem from the exceptional Vinha da Pisca vineyard, most of whose vines exceed the age of 80, and which, in a Vintage year, provides the backbone of Niepoort Vintage Ports.

As the name suggests, Crusted Port will throw a natural deposit in the bottle with time, therefore it is important to decant it before serving. The Niepoort Bioma Crusted Port (Bottled 2014) is most appealing in its youth, but will also benefit from several years of bottle ageing, during which it should be stored lying down.

To produce a Port Wine with a fine and balanced flavour, Niepoort Tawny ages in oak casks for 3,5 years. Freshness, lightness and balance are the key elements of this wine. A Port easy to drink on any occasion. It contains no sediment and does not neet to be decanted. Tawny has a shiny bright colour and soft and sweet tannins. Great with chocolate desserts, cheese like Cheddar, Gouda and Brie, and red meat dishes.

Tawnies with an age indication such as "20 years" are blended from different wines averaging 20 years. Niepoort produces 10, 20 and 30 years old Tawny. The skilful ageing and blending of the different Tawny Ports is the art of Master Blender José Nogueira.

The prolonged ageing in small wooden casks confers the characteristic Tawny colour. The main features of an aged Tawny are the complexity of aromas, the freshness and a persistent bouquet and refinement. After dinner, old Tawny is a good match with cheeses and especially chocolate based desserts. It can also be drunk as an aperitif, served at room temperature or lightly chilled.

This beautifully almost apothecary’s bottle along with its appealing name – "Drink Me" – matches perfectly with the subtle, mellow and refined content. Tawnies with an age indication such as "10 years" are blended from different wines, with an average of 10 years. The prolonged ageing in small wooden casks confers the characteristic Tawny colour. The main features of an aged Tawny are the complexity of aromas, the freshness and refined persistent "bouquet". After dinner, this Tawny is a good match with cheese and chocolate based desserts. It can also be drunk as an aperitif, served at room temperature or slightly chilled.

Colheitas are dated Tawnies aged in small casks. The minimum age requirement is 7 years, but the tradition at Niepoort is to age several more years before bottling. The wine takes on a Tawny hue. Wood and nutty tones are evident on the palate due to the wine’s slow ageing in old casks. Colheita goes well with dry fruits desserts and the portuguese "Leite Creme queimado". As a starter, the combination with foie gras is impressive.

Vintage Port maintains Niepoort's tradition of making balanced Ports with great concentration, being at the same time fine and delicate. We strongly believe we can make a Vintage Port with potencial to last for decades. Vintage Port must be bottled within two or three years of the harvest date.

The magic of Vintage Port is different in every phase: as a young wine it captures the youthful fruit characters. Then, after 20 years or more, the effects of the slow bottle age integration are revealed and finally, after many decades, the spirit dominates the wine. Vintage Port is amazing in all the three phases. Half sweet taste, combining with its strong structure. Firm and long tannins, but balanced as a whole. Please, note that Vintage Port needs to be decanted. Perfect with "Queijo da Serra", Stilton or other blue cheeses and with egg desserts, like the portuguese "Pão de Ló".

With Bioma, we have broken the mold, and made an ultra-traditional style of Vintage Port. Inspired by the old Vintage Ports from 1970 and before, which were shipped in lodge pipes (550 liters) to England, before being bottled after nearly three years, we wanted to get as close as possible to this historic model. Deep colour, with dry fruits hints and silky taste. Perfect with "Queijo da Serra", Stilton or other blue cheeses and egg desserts, like the portuguese "Pão de Ló".

The Pisca vineyard has for many years formed part of the Niepoort Vintage Lot in 2007 one very small parcel of Pisca was set aside and contrary to the current practice of ageing in large wooden vats it was aged in barrels, thus replicating the legendary Niepoort 1970 Vintage which was all aged in barrels. Furthermore, the handling of the wine prior to bottling in a less reductive way attempts to return to the days when Vintage ports were shipped in barrels to northern Europe and then bottled at the end of the second year or even in the third year following the harvest, in contrast to the current practice of bottling after a year and a half. Once again, at Niepoort, we believe that in a world of uniformity we have managed to produce a Vintage Port with a difference, with a return to some of the small technical details from a bygone era. Deep colour, black fruits and bitter chocolate aroma, with silky taste. Perfect with "Queijo da Serra", Stilton or other blue cheeses and egg desserts, like the portuguese "Pão de Ló".

Niepoort created a second style of Vintage Port: “Secundum Vintage”. The Secundum’s intention is the creation of an approachable Vintage that offers immediate satisfaction yet keeping the balance to age for decades. If we compare the Niepoort's Vintage Port with classic music, then Secundum would be like Mozart, young, charming, creative and tangible and the Vintage like Bach: intense, profound, complex and less accessible. Secundum 1999 was the first production of this Vintage, that shows the tannin of the great years, with presence and maturity, which grants longevity, but at the same time, because of its youth, allows an early enjoyment. According to Dirk Niepoort, Secundum 1999 "is quite impressive, it shows the tannins, but also the rich concentrated fruit. It's a powerful Vintage with a great ageing potential." Perfect with “Queijo da Serra”, a Stilton, other blue cheeses or soft cheese. Egg based desserts with “Pão de Ló” (Portuguese sponge based cake).

The second generation of the Niepoort family, in the late 19th century, had the fortunate idea of buying from a german glass factory in Oldenburg about 4000 glass balloons (in the form of old apothecaries’ bottles) of dark-green glass with varying capacities from 8 to 11 litres. Eduard Karel Jacob van der Niepoort died early and it was his son, Eduard Marius van der Niepoort, Dirk’s grandfather, who gave purpose to the demijohns by bottling the best wines of the 1931 harvest, thus creating the type “Garrafeira Niepoort”. Since the distant year of 1931 to this day the maturation in the demijohns, sealed with a cork, has been closely watched, it is almost a “sacred” ritual for both the Niepoort and the Nogueira families. Garrafeira is not just a wine it means by itself quality far above the traditional canons. On the taste reveals a great mixture of sensations, aromas and flavours with a perfect balance between youth and experience, between the novelty of the fruit and the “good old age” that only long years of ageing can achieve.

Congratulations to Niepoort on its 170th anniversary!

To celebrate this occasion, we decided to bottle 999 bottles of the "new" old VV, in which we tried to combine the concentration and richness of the original VV with the refinement and purity that increasingly characterises Niepoort wines. The base for this blend is a very fine Port from 1863, of the highest quality, exquisitely aged in casks until 1972, and then "bottled" in demijohns.

The ancient and rare wines that are part of this batch, along with their aging in demijohns, make this Port unique and with a huge potential for ageing in bottle.

VV was created by Dirk Niepoort’s grandfather (Eduard Marius van der Niepoort) at the beginning of the 20th century. Eduard Marius had a great passion and commitment to quality, and as such had the dream to make the world's best Tawny and simply call it VV – Vinho Velho (Old Wine). It turned out to be a legendary wine, considered by many to be the best Tawny ever made. The original batch, like the new one, was based in pre-phylloxera wines, very concentrated and with "unlimited longevity." The new VV tries to be all this and even more, precise, balanced and long. This wine was made ​​with future generations in mind, and with the aim of demonstrating the timelessness of the Great Port Wine. In Porto Veritas.

"This VV has nothing to do with the VV of the 1950s, which was wine aged in the Douro Region. The new VV is a Port wine 100% aged in Vila Nova de Gaia, a real treasure, unique for its rarity and quality."

An oldtimer is back: Niepoort Aguardente Vínica Velha. For some time now, nearly 20 years, this brandy was much appreciated and respected, but no longer marketed. Recently, the brandy was a little refreshed with a 10-year-old brandy to return to the arena. Dark topaz-coloured, with shades of yellow. Very fine and vinous, hints of old wood, finely balanced. Very concentrated flavour after long ageing in oak barrels, very intense with a long, spirited finish.

With Bioma, we have broken the mold, and made an ultra-traditional style of Vintage Port. Inspired by the old Vintage Ports from 1970 and before, which were shipped in lodge pipes (550 liters) to England, before being bottled after nearly three years, we wanted to get as close as possible to this historic model. Deep colour, with dry fruits hints and silky taste. Perfect with "Queijo da Serra", Stilton or other blue cheeses and egg desserts, like the portuguese "Pão de Ló".

White Port is made from white grapes: Malvasia, Viosinho and Gouveio. The juice is fermented as a white wine until the fermentation is stopped by the addition of pure grape brandy. After spending one year in large wood vats the wine is transferred to Casks (550 liter oak barrels). It is then aged in wood until at least 3 years before bottling. Deep gold, with nuts and hints of fruit fresh aroma and half sweet taste. Serve chilled as an aperitif or with desserts or even by itself.

Fabelhaft Niepoort Dry White is made in the tradicional style with long skin maceration. The final blend includes different wines aged in oak casks with an average of 3,5 years. Golden, with nuts and almonds aroma and a fresh concentrated finish. Great when served chilled as an aperitif or with tonic water, ice and a slice of lemon or lemon peel.

To produce a Port Wine with a fine and balanced flavour, Niepoort Tawny ages in oak casks for 3,5 years. Freshness, lightness and balance are the key elements of this wine. A Port easy to drink on any occasion. Tawny has a shiny bright colour and soft and sweet tannins. Tawny Port keeps well for several years, although the wine will not improve with age. It contains no sediment and does not neet to be decanted.

Regarding the Fabelhaft Tawny Reserve wine, it spends most of its time ageing in small barrels in the Niepoort lodge in Vila Nova de Gaia. The small barrels enable a soft and light contact with air through the pores of the wood, which results in a slow oxidation process over the years. Ideal with dry fruits, apple pie, the portuguese "Leite Creme" or patê.

Late Bottled Vintage Port is from a single year. The wine ages 4-6 years in old oak casks (opposed to Vintage that ages 2-3). LBV fills the gap between the Rubies and the Vintage Ports since a Ruby Port should be drunk quite young and a great Vintage Port may need 15 to 20 years to really open up and show its splendour. This led to the idea in the 1960s to age the wine 4 to 6 years in large casks before bottling it, thereby producing a wine with the style of a Vintage Port with its deep colour and concentration of fruit, but with a more mature character caused by the longer ageing in wood. Late Bottled Vintage is the perfect Port to accompany chocolate desserts, specially bitter chocolate or a pepper steak.

Tawnies with an age indication such as "10 years" are blended from different wines averaging 10 years. Niepoort produces 10, 20 and 30 years old Tawny. The skilful ageing and blending of the different Tawny Ports is the art of Master Blender José Nogueira.

The prolonged ageing in small wooden casks confers the characteristic Tawny colour. The main features of an aged Tawny are the complexity of aromas, the freshness and a persistent bouquet and refinement. After dinner, old Tawny is a good match with cheeses and especially chocolate based desserts. It can also be drunk as an aperitif, served at room temperature or lightly chilled.

At Niepoort we believe that the colour of the Port should be inspired by the "ruby stone". Ruby ages an average of 3 years. The grapes come from old vineyards in Cima Corgo region of Douro Valley. The wine ages in large wooden casks at Niepoort cellars, in Vila Nova de Gaia. Fabelhaft Ruby is fresh, young and fruity. An expressive Port with great character. Ruby keeps well for several years, although the wine will not improve with age. No decanting is necessary since the wine contains no sediment. Serve after a meal, by itself or with soft cheese.

Niepoort Fabelhaft Ruby Reserve aims to be an accessible and easy drinking wine, while at the same time, retaining a high level of quality. A modern youthful style, resulting from a careful selection of very special wines aged for 3 to 4 years. Bright red in colour, exhibiting a very attractive aroma, with notes of ripe red fruit. Goes well with chocolate based desserts, soft cheese or by itself.

The first Quinado by Niepoort was launched in the 1950’s. It was a wine made from Tawny Ports to which quinine was added and then sent overseas to be used as medicine against malaria.

It’s the return of an old classic: the Niepoort Aguardente Velhíssima.

In the past, Brandy as well as Aguardente velha (a type of spirit aged for long periods of time) were great classics at Niepoort, with the 25-year-old Aguardente considered as one of the best in Portugal. During the 1990s, Dirk Niepoort relaunched and refined the Aguardente by ageing it for a much longer period – around 40 years –, lowering the sweetness and intensifying the aromatics and finesse, with an elegance and purity rare for Portugal. The current new edition of the Aguardente is even older (with an average age of around 50 years), more expressive, purer and more elegant.


Nieuport 20 - History



























1918 Chronology of Aviation History
Major Aviation Events

1918 Aviation Records

Speed: 163.06-mph, Roland Rohlfs, Curtiss Wasp, 19 August 1918

Distance: 1,180.61-miles, Werner Landman, Albatros, 28 June 1914

Altitude: 28,897-feet, Rudolph Schroeder, Bristol F.2B, 18 November 1918

Weight: 35,0531-lbs, Staaken, R.XIVa

Engine Power: 700-hp, Fiat, A.14

January 1918

January &mdash First flight of the SEA IV.

January 25 &mdash 2nd Lt Carl Mather is killed in an aircraft collision.

February 1918

February &mdash First flight of the Nieuport B.N.1.

February 5 &mdash 2nd Lt Stephen W. Thompson achieves the first aerial victory by the U.S. military.

February 8 &mdash Lafayette Escadrille, the U.S. volunteer squadron serving in the French Army is transferred to the US Army and redesignated the 103rd Aero Squadron.

March 4 &mdash First flight of the Airco DH.10.

March 6 &mdash The Finnish Air Force is founded.

March 6 &mdash The first ever successful flight of a powered unmanned heavier-than-air craft, the Curtiss-Sperry Flying Bomb, which was the precursor to modern UAVs.

March 10 &mdash First flight of the Junkers D.I.

March 11 &mdash The first regular international airmail service begins, with Hansa-Brandenburg C.I aircraft linking Vienna, Lviv, Proskurov, and Kiev.

March 11 &mdash Vienna, Austria &hellip The first regular and scheduled international airmail service in the world began, between Vienna and Kiev.

March 18 &mdash The first Norwegian airline, Det Norske Luftfartrederi, is founded.

March 21 &mdash Germany launches Operation Michael, marking the beginning of the Spring Offensive. In the initial attack against the British front west of St. Quentin, the German Army Air Service has 1,680 aircraft to the Royal Flying Corps' 579.

March 24 &mdash Captain J.L. Trollope of No. 43 Squadron RFC shoots down six German aircraft in a day.

March 25 &mdash Ensign John McNamara makes the first U.S. Navy attack on a submarine.

March 30 &mdash Alan Jerrard VC, British ace (7 victories) is shot down by Benno Fiala von Fernbrugg and taken captive.

April 1 &mdash The Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service combine to form the Royal Air Force. The Women's Royal Air Force is formed at the same time.

April 12 &mdash The final Zeppelin raid on England is carried out.

April 12 &mdash Captain H.W. Woollett of No. 43 Squadron RAF scores six victories in two sorties, including five Albatros D.Vs.

April 13 &mdash CunÇco, Chile &hellip First flight across the Andes, from Argentina to Chile, was made by Lieutenant Luis C. Candelaria of the Argentinean Army. Flying east to west, Candelaria took off in his Morane-Saulnier Parasol monoplane from Zapala, Argentina and landed at CunÇco, Chile. The flight was approximately 130 miles in distance and had to clear mountain peaks of 13,000 feet.

April 21 &mdash Manfred von Richthofen, a living legend called the "Red Baron" and "ace of aces" is shot down and killed. By the time of his death, he had claimed 80 victories. Credit for his kill is given to Canadian Cpt Roy Brown, but this is disputed by others who claim that he was killed by ground fire from Australian troops.

April 23 &mdash Lt Paul Baer shoots down his fifth aircraft, becoming the first ace of the American Expeditionary Force.

April 25 &mdash Belgium's top-scoring ace, Willy Coppens, claims his first victory.

May &mdash First flight of the Handley Page V/1500.

May 15 &mdash The first regular US airmail service commences, between New York and Washington, DC. The first flight is made by Lt Geoffrey Boyle in a Curtiss JN-4H.

May 19 &mdash Raoul Lufbery, commander of the 94th (Hat in the Ring) Aero Squadron and second highest scoring American ace with 17 victories, is killed in air combat.

May 20 &mdash German bombs fall on London for the last time in World War I.

May 24 &mdash Josef Kiss, Austro-Hungarian 5th highest scoring ace, is shot down in combat. He had scored 19 victories.

June &mdash A detachment of US bomber pilots is stationed in Italy to strike at Austria.

June 6 &mdash First flight of the Fairey III.

June 19 &mdash Italy's highest-scoring ace, Maggiore Francesco Baracca is killed by Austrian ground fire. He had claimed 34 victories.

June 24 &mdash The RAF deploys its new 1,650 lb (748 kg) bomb for the first time. One is dropped on Middelkerke, Belgium by a Handley Page O/400 of No. 216 Squadron RAF.

June 24 &mdash Montreal to Toronto, Canada &hellip First official airmail flight in Canada, from Montreal to Toronto, by a Curtiss JN-4, flown by Captain B. A. Peck, RAF.

July 9 &mdash British ace James McCudden is killed when his aircraft crashes on take-off.

July 26 &mdash Maj Edward Mannock, Britain's highest scoring ace of the war, is shot down by German ground fire. He had scored 73 victories.

July 31 &mdash Lt Frank Linke-Crawford, Austrian 4th highest scoring ace, is shot down in combat. He had scored 27 victories.

August 1918

August &mdash The Fokker D.VIII entered service during August.

August 7 &mdash First flight of the Blériot-SPAD S.XX.

August 11 &mdash Flt Sub-Lt Stuart Culley shoots down Zeppelin L 53 after taking off from a barge towed behind HMS Redoubt.

August 11 &mdash The first use of a parachute from a combat aircraft when a German pilot escapes his burning Pfalz D.III after being attacked by a pilot from No. 19 Squadron RAF.

August 12 &mdash New York City to Washington, D.C. &hellip The US Post Office takes over airmail services from the US Army, thereby establishing the first regular airmail service in America, with a New York to Washington route.

August 17 &mdash First flight of the Martin MB-1.

August 21 &mdash First flight of the Nieuport-Delage Ni-D 29.

September 1918

September &mdash Known as Black September, during the month the Allies lose 560 aircraft, of which 87 are American.

September 12 &mdash 627 French and 611 US fighters are brought together for the Battle of Saint-Mihiel. At the time, it is the largest force of aircraft assembled for a single operation.

September 24 &mdash Lt David Ingalls claims his fifth victory, to become the only U.S. Navy ace of World War I.

October 1918

October 2 &mdash First flight of the Kettering Bug.

October 5 &mdash French famous pilot Lt Roland Garros is shot down and killed in combat.

October 14 &mdash Baron Willy Coppens, highest scoring Belgian ace, is heavily wounded, ending his combat career. He had scored 37 victories, 34 of which were observation balloons.

October 29 &mdash The Danish airline Det Danske Luftfartselskab, the oldest airline that still exists, is founded.

November 1918

November 11 &mdash The end of the First World War. The RAF suffered 16,623 casualties, while the German Air Service suffered in excess of 15,000.

December 1918

December 12 &mdash Cpt R.M. Smith, Brig Gen A.E. Borton and Maj Gen W. Salmond set out in a Handley Page O/400 from Heliopolis to Karachi, to survey a route for airmail to India.

December 13 &mdash Maj A.S.C. MacLaren and Cpt Robert Halley set out on the first England-India flight, in a Handley Page V/1500.

Works Cited

  1. Gunston, Bill, et al. Chronicle of Aviation. Liberty, Missouri: JL Publishing Inc., 1992. 14-17
  2. Parrish, Wayne W. (Publisher). "United States Chronology". 1962 Aerospace Yearbook, Forty-Third Annual Edition. Washington, DC: American Aviation Publications, Inc., 1962, 446-469.
  3. Wikipedia, 1918 in aviation
  4. Shupek, John (photos and card images), The Skytamer Archive. Skytamer.com, Whittier, CA

Copyright © 1998-2018 (Our 20 th Year) Skytamer Images, Whittier, California
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


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