Information

USS Topeka (CL-67)

USS Topeka (CL-67)


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

USS Topeka (CL-67)

USS Topeka (CL-67) was built as a Cleveland class light cruiser (CL-67) and in that guise fought at Okinawa and took part in the attacks on the Japanese Home Islands during 1945. She was later rebuilt as a guided-missile cruiser (CLG-8) and had another ten years of active service in that role during the 1960s. During this period she was awarded three battle stars for combat in Vietnam to add to the two she had been awarded during the Second World War.

The Topeka was laid down in April 1943, launched in August 1944 and commissioned on 23 December 1944. A shakedown cruise and training followed, before she set sail from Boston on 10 April 1945 to join the Pacific Fleet.

The Topeka reached the fleet at Ulithi Atoll on 1 June 1945, as the flagship of CruDiv 18. Three days later she left Ulithi as part of a small group of ships to join the fast carriers of Task Force 38. Her first combat cruise came in June 1945. The carriers attacked Kanoya on Kyushi on 8 June, the Ryukyu Islands on 9 June and Minami Daito on 10 June. During this third attack the cruisers were able carry out their own shore bombardment, so the Topeka got to fire her main guns in anger almost as soon as she joined the fleet. This was towards the end of the Okinawa campaign.

The Topeka's second and final Second World War combat cruise began on 1 July when Task Force 38 began a six-week long attack on the Japanese Home Islands. The Topeka formed part of the cruiser screen and for most of the period her role was to protect the carriers while their aircraft swept across the Japanese Home Islands. She did have one chance for independent action on the night of 18 July when she joined the Atlanta (CL-104), Duluth (CL-87), Oklahoma City and DesRon 62 in an anti-shipping sweep in the approaches to Tokyo Bay. During this raid the Topeka opened fire on Japanese installations at Nojima Zaki, at the entrance to Sagami Bay (the area of sea outside Tokyo Bay).

This series of attacks ended on 15 August when news reached the fleet that Japan had surrendered. The Topeka remained at sea for another month, before entering Tokyo Bay in mid September. She didn't stay for long, and on 1 October departed for the US, travelling via Okinawa where she picked up 529 veterans being shipped home. She reached Portland, Oregon, on 19 October and then went for a refit.

The Topeka spent most of 1946 on duty in the western Pacific. She returned to the area again in October 1947 and operated off the north China coast until March 1948. After a spell spent serving off the US West Coast she was decommissioned in June 1949 and became part of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

After eight years in the reserve the Topeka was chosen for conversion to a guided missile cruiser, as CLG-8. This took three years and she was re-commissioned on 26 March 1960. During this process she lost most of her aft guns, which were replaced with twin Terrier surface-to-air guided missile launchers.

The next three years were spent on peace-time duties, including two periods of duty in the western Pacific. Her third tour in the western Pacific also began peacefully, but it was interrupted by the Gulf of Tonkin incident when North Vietnamese torpedo-boats attacked two US destroyers in August 1964. The Topekaspent part of the rest of this tour patrolling in the Gulf of Tonkin, before returning to the US late in the year.

On 29 November 1965 the Topeka left for her fourth post-war tour in the Far East, but this time she was going as flagship of the Cruiser-Destroyer Group in the 7th Fleet, to provide support for American and South Vietnamese troops fighting in Vietnam. She performed a mix of shore bombardment and search and rescue missions to support the carrier forces. This tour lasted for six months, before she returned to the US in May 1966.

After five months on the west coast the Topeka underwent another upgrade, which lasted until June 1967. In August 1967 she joined the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, her first visit to that sea. She served as the flagship of TG 60.2 for five months, before she was relieved in January 1968 and returned to the US. After a brief spell in home waters she moved back to the Mediterranean in June-July 1968 to rejoin the Sixth Fleet. This final operational tour was a peaceful affair and she set sail for the US on 9 December after a relaxed tour of the full length of the Mediterranean.

On 5 June 1969 the Topeka was de-commissioned. She joined the reserve fleet, but on 1 December 1973 she was removed from the Navy List and in 1975 she was sold for scrap.

Displacement (standard)

11,744t

Displacement (loaded)

14,131t

Top Speed

32.5kts

Range

11,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

3-5in

- armour deck

2in

- bulkheads

5in

- barbettes

6in

- turrets

6.5in face
3in top
3in side
1.5in rear

- conning tower

5in
2.25in roof

Length

610ft 1in oa

Armaments

Twelve 6in/47 guns (four triple turrets)
Twelve 5in/38 guns (six double positions)
Twenty eight 40mm guns (4x4, 6x2)
Ten 20mm guns
Four aircraft

Crew complement

1,285

Builder

Bethlehem, Quincy

Laid down

21 April 1943

Launched

19 August 1944

Commissioned

23 December 1944

Stricken

1 December 1973


TOPEKA CLG 8

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Cleveland Class Light Gun Cruiser
    Keel Laid 21 April 1943 - Launched 19 August 1944

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Topeka CL 67

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Topeka cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Dedication to those who lost their lives
  • Crew Roster 1944-1945 (Names and Rank)
  • Story of the Topeka Odyssey
  • Commissioning
  • Admirals Inspection
  • Entertainment and Recreation
  • Typhoon
  • Pacific War Action
  • Many Shipboard Action Shots
  • Full Screen Divisional Group Photos

Over 156 Photos on 143 pages. 17 pages with written description telling the WWII story for this ship.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Light Cruiser during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Topeka during the World War II era (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    USS Topeka (CL-67) - History

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Topeka CL 67 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Dedication to those who lost their lives
    • Crew Roster 1944-1945 (Names and Rank)
    • Story of the Topeka Odyssey
    • Commissioning
    • Admirals Inspection
    • Entertainment and Recreation
    • Typhoon
    • Pacific War Action
    • Many Shipboard Action Shots
    • Full Screen Divisional Group Photos

    Over 156 Photos on 143 pages. 17 pages with written description telling the WWII story for this ship.

    Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Light Cruiser during World War II.


    USS Topeka (CL-67) - History

    USS Topeka (SSN 754), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named for Topeka, Kansas. The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on November 28, 1983 and her keel was laid down on May 13, 1986. She was launched on January 23, 1988, sponsored by Elizabeth Dole and commissioned on October 21, 1989, with Cmdr. Timothy Reichert in command.

    In August 1992 USS Topeka began her first overseas deployment which involved six months of operation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. She was the first attack submarine in the Pacific Fleet to deploy in support of a carrier battle group. On November 4, 1992 SSN 754 achieved another first by conducting operations in the Arabian Gulf.

    In January 1995 the attack submarine returned to the Arabian Gulf during her second deployment in support of a carrier battle group.

    In February 1996, USS Topeka changed her homeport from San Diego, Calif., to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    In October 2002, after completing a Modernization Period in Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, the nuclear attack submarine shifted its homeport back to San Diego, California.

    April 4, 2006 SSN 754 returned to Naval Station Point Loma after her eighth Western Pacific deployment. Topeka's schedule included two operations in support of national security objectives and numerous anti-submarine warfare-training exercises with U.S. and allied aircraft. She made port calls in Guam, Singapore, Hawaii, Saipan, and Nagano and Nagasaki, Japan.

    October 16, 2007 USS Topeka departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment.

    November 6, SSN 754 recently departed Yokosuka, Japan, after a routine port call.

    December 27, The Topeka arrived in Fleet Activities Sasebo, Japan, for an eight-day port visit.

    April 16, 2008 USS Topeka returned to Naval Submarine Base Point Loma after a six-month deployment in the western Pacific. She also visited Okinawa, Guam and the Philippines.

    June 23, 2009 USS Topeka departed homeport for a scheduled western Pacific and Middle East deployment.

    August 12, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine pulled to HMAS Stirling at Garden Island, Australia, for a scheduled port visit. The Topeka recently participated in Ship Anti-Submarine Warfare Readiness and Evaluation (SHAREM) exercise off the east coast of Australia with the Royal Australian and Royal Canadian Navies.

    September 11, USS Topeka recently pulled into Manama, Bahrain, for a routine port visit.

    April 15, 2010 Cmdr. Michael D. Bratton relieved Cmdr. Marc A. Stern as CO of USS Topeka during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Point Loma.

    June 13, 2011 SSN 754 arrived in Callao naval base for a scheduled port visit to Lima, Peru, to participate in the commemorative activities for the Centenary of the Submarine Force.

    July 6, USS Topeka, commanded by Cmdr. James A. Belz, returned to San Diego after a two-month deployment to the Southern Command Area of Responsibility (AoR).

    March 6, 2012 USS Topeka departed Naval Base Point Loma for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

    March 20, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine pulled into Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a six-day port call.

    May 30, USS Topeka pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, to get tender support services from USS Emory S. Land (AS 39). Brief stops in Sasebo, Japan, on July 2, 6, 19 and 31st.

    August 10, The Topeka arrived again in Naval Base Yokosuka, Japan, for a six-day port call.

    September 5, USS Topeka returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment. The sub traveled more than 35,000 n.m. and also made port call to Changi Naval Base in Singapore.

    November 2, USS Topeka departed San Diego, Calif., for a two-year Engineered Overhaul (EOH) at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine.

    December 6, SSN 754 arrived at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., for a brief port call Entered the PNSY on Dec. 16.

    February 7, 2014 Cmdr. David P. Lammers relieved Cmdr. James A. Belz as CO of the Topeka during a change-of-command ceremony at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard's auditorium.

    April ?, USS Topeka departed dry-dock at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, 20 days ahead of schedule.

    May 29, 2015 USS Topeka moored at Sierra 2 Wharf in its new homeport of Apra Harbor, Guam, after a seven-week transit from Groton, Conn.

    December 16, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine departed Apra Harbor for a Friends and Family Day Cruise Day-long underway again on Dec. 17.

    December 2?, USS Topeka departed homeport for a western Pacific patrol.

    January 12, 2016 The Topeka moored at Alava Pier in Subic Bay, Philippines, for a three-day port call.

    March 5, SSN 754 is currently moored at Alpha Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam Moored outboard the USS Frank Cable (AS 40) for routine maintenance on March 2?.

    July 1, USS Topeka moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor following a two-month western Pacific patrol.

    August 5, Cmdr. Steven Tarr, III relieved Cmdr. David P. Lammers as CO of the Topeka during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Guam Chapel.

    October 19, USS Topeka is currently moored at Alpha Wharf on Naval Base Guam Underway on Oct. 2? Moored at Sierra 2 Wharf on Nov. 1?.

    January 17, 2017 The Topeka moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, for a three-day port call.

    January 28, USS Topeka moored at Alpha Wharf in Apr Harbor following a two-month western Pacific patrol.

    April 19, USS Topeka is currently moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land for a maintenance availability Moored at Berth 2, Romeo Wharf on April 2?.

    September 6, The Topeka recently moored at Alpha Wharf on Naval Base Guam Moored at Berth 2, Romeo Wharf on Oct. ?.

    November 27, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine made a brief stop in Sasebo Harbor, Japan, for personnel transfer Brief stop off White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, for personnel transfer on Dec. 1, 4 and 7th.

    December 1?, USS Topeka moored at Alpha Wharf on Naval Base Guam after completing a two-month patrol.

    January 10, 2018 The Topeka made a brief stop in Sasebo Harbor, Japan, for personnel transfer Brief stop off Sasebo again on Jan. 13 and Jan. 18 Moored at Akasaki Pier in Fleet Activities Sasebo from Feb. 19-23 Brief stop off Sasebo on Feb. 26.

    March 2, SSN 754 moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a five-day port call.

    March 30, USS Topeka moored at Alpha Wharf on Naval Base Guam following a three-month patrol.

    June ?, USS Topeka departed Apra Harbor for a routine patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR).

    June 23, The Topeka made a brief stop in Sasebo Harbor, Japan, for personnel transfer Brief stop off White Beach, Okinawa, on June 27, June 29 and Aug. 25.

    August 29, USS Topeka moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka for an extended five-day port visit.

    March 1, 2019 Cmdr. Richard D. Salazar, II relieved Cmdr. Steven Tarr, III as CO of the Topeka during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Guam Chapel.

    May 20, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine is currently moored at Berth 2, Sierra Wharf on Naval Base Guam.

    September 10, USS Topeka moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a week-long port call Arrived off the coast of Guam on Nov. 29.

    December 20, USS Topeka moored at Berth 2, Romeo Wharf on Naval Base Guam following a four-month patrol.

    January 21, 2020 The Topeka moved from Romeo Wharf to Bravo Wharf on Naval Base Guam.

    March 17, SSN 754 moored at Berth 2, Romeo Wharf on Naval Base Guam after a five-day underway in support of Group-Sail with the ships from Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 Underway again on April 22 Returned home on May 15.

    October 24, USS Topeka returned to Apra Harbor following a western Pacific patrol.

    November 30, USS Topeka is currently moored at Berth 1, Sierra Wharf on Naval Base Guam Underway en route to Pearl Harbor on Dec. 4.

    December 15, USS Topeka moored at Wharf Y3B in its new homeport of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, after forward-deployed to Guam for five-and-a-half years.

    May 14, 2021 Cmdr. James E. Fulks relieved Cmdr. Richard D. Salazar, II as CO of the Topeka during a change-of-command ceremony at the USS Parche Memorial on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.


    Cleveland-class light cruiser

    The Cleveland-class of light cruisers were a class of several light cruisers produced by the United States Navy during World War II. A development on the previous Brooklyn-class, this class had increased cruising range, torpedo protection, and anti-aircraft armament, along with more advanced fire control systems.

    Fifty-two ships were planned, but nine of them were refitted into Independence-class aircraft carriers, and two of them were made into the Fargo-class. Of the 27 commissioned, one was turned into a guided-missile cruiser, and five were fitted as Galveston and Providence-class guided-missile cruisers.

    The cruisers served mostly in the Pacific Fleet, but some of them worked in Europe and the Mediterranean in the Atlantic Fleet. After the war, many of them were decommissioned by 1950. None were recommissioned for the Korean War, and only six stayed commissioned, serving as missile ships.


    USS Topeka (CL-67) - History

    041124-N-8977L-001 San Diego, Calif. (Nov. 24, 2004) - The maneuvering watch aboard the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) prepares for mooring after being underway for three days off the coast of San Diego, Calif. Sailors aboard Topeka participated in Submarine Squadron Eleven&rsquos (COMSUBRON 11) Chef Exchange Program in which chef Paul Murphy from Humphrey&rsquos by the Bay, in San Diego, spent three days aboard Topeka giving Culinary Specialists tips and techniques on how to improve the quality of food and service aboard Topeka. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Johansen Laurel (RELEASED)

    Learn about ships that have borne the USS Topeka name:

    The first TOPEKA was originally built in 1881 in Germany for Portugal as the Diogenes, but Portugal never took over the ship. She went to Thames Iron Works in England where the US Navy bought her on April 2, 1898 and commissioned her the same day as USS TOPEKA (PG 35) (Patrol Gunboat). She took part in the blockade of Cuba during the Spanish-American War and was decommissioned and recommissioned four times between 1898 and 1923 before her final decommissioning in 1929. She was stricken from the Navy list on January 2, 1930.

    The third USS TOPEKA was born from the second. USS TOPEKA (CL 67) was towed from California to New York Naval Shipyard in 1957 for conversion to a guided missile light cruiser. The conversion was completed in 1960, and on March 26, 1960, USS TOPEKA (CLG 8) was commissioned at Brooklyn Naval Shipyard.

    Her initial homeport was Long Beach, CA from where she deployed to the Western Pacific (WESTPAC) four times. Her fourth WESTPAC included operations in the South China Sea and Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War.

    She served as flagship for Cruiser Destroyer Group, Seventh Fleet on that deployment and fired her guns against an enemy for the first time in 21 years, over 3,000 rounds of 5-inch and 6-inch ammunition.

    USS TOPEKA (CLG 8) transferred to the Mayport, FL in 1968. After a Mediterranean cruise with the Sixth Fleet, TOPEKA was decommissioned in Boston, MA on June 5, 1969. Her name was struck from the Navy list on December 1, 1973, and she was sold for scrap on March 20, 1975.

    The current USS TOPEKA (SSN 754) is counted as the third ship named for the capitol city. It was launched January 23, 1988 and commissioned October 21, 1989 as a fast attack nuclear submarine, the 43rd of the USS LOS ANGELES Class. TOPEKA was initially homeported in Honolulu, HI and moved to San Diego, CA, its current homeport, in November 2002


    JC's Naval, Maritime and Military News

    Extensively converted to a light guided missile cruiser from 1957-60, TOPEKA was recommissioned as CLG 8. Decommissioned on June 5, 1969, and stricken from the Navy list on September 1, 1973, the TOPEKA was sold for scrapping on March 20, 1975.

    USS Topeka (CL-67/CLG-8), a Cleveland-class light cruiser was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named after the city of Topeka, Kansas.

    USS Topeka (CL-67), a Cleveland-class light cruiser in service with the United States Navy from 1944 to 1949. From 1957 to 1960, she was converted to a Providence-class guided missile cruiser and redesignated CLG-8. The cruiser served again from 1960 to 1969 and was finally scrapped in 1975.

    1940s [ edit ]

    After shakedown in the West Indies and post-shakedown repairs, Topeka departed Boston on 10 April 1945 for duty with the Pacific Fleet. The following day she joined Oklahoma City, and steamed via Culebra Island and Guantánamo Bay to the Panama Canal. They transited the canal on 19 April and reported for duty on the 20th. The next day, Topeka and her steaming mate headed for Pearl Harbor, where they arrived on 2 May. Following almost three weeks of gunnery exercises in the Hawaiian Islands, the cruiser sailed west from Pearl Harbor as the flagship of Cruiser Division 18. She entered Ulithi in the Western Carolines on 1 June and, after three days in the anchorage, put to sea with Bon Homme Richard, Oklahoma City, Moale, and Ringgold to rendezvous with Task Force 38. [1]

    On her first cruise with the fast carriers, she screened them against enemy air attack while their planes made three raids against targets in the enemy's home islands and the Ryukyu Islands. On 8 June, TF 38 aircraft hit Kanoya on Kyūshū, the home of Japanese naval aviation. The next day, they struck Okino Daito in the Ryukyus, located a little over 200 miles west of Okinawa. The third and final strike of her first combat cruise came on 10 June and provided the cruiser with her initial opportunity to join the fray. While TG 38.1 aircraft bombed and strafed the airfield on Minami Daito, the ships in the screen, Topeka among them, moved in and took the other installations under fire. At the conclusion of that action, Topeka moved off with the rest of TG 38.1 bound for San Pedro Bay, Leyte. [1]

    After spending the latter half of June at Leyte for relaxation and replenishment, the light cruiser returned to sea on 1 July with TF 38 for the final six-week carrier sweep of the Japanese home islands. The task force made a fueling rendezvous on the 8th and then began a run-in toward Tokyo which the American planes bombed on 10 July. Next, the ships moved north to Honshū and Hokkaidō for a two-day antishipping sweep of the area around Hakodate and Muroran. They retired from the area for another fueling rendezvous on the 16th, but returned to the vicinity of southern Honshū and resumed the aerial blitz of Tokyo on the 17th󈝾th. On the night of the latter date, Topeka had another opportunity to strike the enemy directly when she joined Atlanta, Duluth, Oklahoma City, and the destroyers of DesRon 62 in an antishipping sweep of the entrance to Sagami Nada near the sea approaches to Tokyo. During that sweep, she fired her guns at Japanese installations located on Nojima Zaki, the point of land which marks the eastern terminus of the entrance into Sagami Nada. Completing another replenishment retirement from 19󈞃 July, the task force resumed its air raids on central Japan with two extensive forays against shipping in the Inland Sea on the 24th and 28th, respectively. [1]

    A typhoon at the end of July forced the task force to take evasive action and postpone further air operations until the second week in August. At that time, Topeka steamed north with TF 38 while the carriers moved into position to send sortie after sortie against heavy concentrations of enemy aircraft on northern Honshū. Those raids, launched on 9󈝶 August, proved eminently successful, wiping out what was later learned to be the transportation for 2,000 shock troops being assembled for a one-way, suicide mission to destroy the B-29 Superfortress bases on Tinian. The carrier planes paid return visits to Tokyo on the 12th󈝹th and were taking off to repeat those attacks when a message arrived on the 15th, telling of Japan's capitulation. [1]

    Topeka patrolled Japanese waters until mid-September, at which time she entered Tokyo Bay. She remained there until 1 October, the day she began her homeward voyage to the United States. The cruiser stopped briefly at Okinawa on the 4th to embark 529 veterans and resumed her eastern progress on the 5th. On 19 October, she arrived in Portland, Oregon, and disembarked her passengers. Ten days later, she steamed south to San Pedro, California, for overhaul. On 3 January 1946, the warship put to sea to return to the Far East. She reached Yokosuka on the 24th and began duty supporting American occupation forces in Japan, China, and in the Central Pacific islands. During that tour of duty, which lasted until the following fall, she called at Sasebo, Japan, Tsingtao and Shanghai in China Manila in the Philippines and Guam in the Mariana Islands. The cruiser returned to San Pedro on 20 November. [1]

    Following an overhaul and operations along the west coast, she headed back to the Orient on 22 September 1947. Upon her arrival at Yokosuka, Japan, on 10 October, she became a unit of TF 71. Operating from bases at Shanghai and Tsingtao. the warship patrolled the north China coast while civil war raged on shore between Nationalist and communist factions. She concluded that duty early in March and entered Nagasaki, Japan, on the 8th. Following visits to Sasebo and Kure, Topeka sailed for the United States on 25 April and arrived in Long Beach, California, on 7 May. Later that month, she moved to Pearl Harbor for a four-month overhaul at the completion of which she returned to the west coast. Late in October, the warship resumed local operations out of Long Beach and out of San Diego. She remained so occupied until February 1949. On 25 February, she arrived in San Francisco to prepare for inactivation. Topeka was decommissioned there on 18 June 1949, and berthed with the local group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet.


    SSN 754 - U SS Topeka


    Groton, Connecticut - December 2012


    San Diego, California - November 2012


    San Diego, California - November 2012


    Yokosuka, Japan - August 2012


    the Submarine Tender USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) with USS Tucson (SSN 770) and USS Topeka (SSN 754 - right) - Polaris Point, Guam - May 2012


    Polaris Point, Guam - May 2012


    Polaris Point, Guam - May 2012


    San Diego, California - March 2012


    San Diego, California - June 2009


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - June 2009


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - April 2008


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - October 2007


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - October 2007


    San Diego, California - November 2004


    San Diego, California - November 2004


    Yokosuka, Japan - March 2003


    Yokosuka, Japan - March 2003


    1995


    1995


    1995


    1994


    1992


    1992


    1992


    1992


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - 1991


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - 1991


    Naval Base Point Loma, San Diego, California - 1991


    1991


    1991


    1991


    commissioning ceremony - October 21, 1989

    The third Topeka (SSN-754) was laid down on 13 May 1986 at Groton, Conn., by General Dynamics Electric Boat launched on 23 January 1988 sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth H. Dole, wife of Senator Robert J. Dole of Kansas and was commissioned on 21 October 1989, Cmdr. Timothy M. Reichert in command.

    In 2003, the Pacific Fleet conducted a pilot deployment “to add teeth and firepower” to the fleet An expeditionary strike group (ESG), centered around amphibious assault ship Peleliu (LHA-5), provided surface and submarine force war fighting capabilities to the traditional amphibious ready groups (ARGs). The concept emerged as part of the Chief of Naval Operations’ Sea Power 21 strategy.

    “The need for expeditionary strike groups arose last fall during the global war on terrorism,” Adm. Walter F. Doran, Commander Pacific Fleet observed, “when Atlantic Fleet’s amphibious ready group, the USS Bataan ARG, needed surface warfare capability and was joined by surface combatants. This encouraged pilot deployments for the ESGs.”

    The ESGs were to enable the fleets to cover more parts of the world effectively, providing mobile, self-sustaining forces able to undertake missions across the entire spectrum of operations. Each of the ARGs normally included an amphibious assault ship, a dock landing ship, and an amphibious transport dock, and embarked a marine expeditionary unit. The ESG concept enabled the Navy to organize 12 carrier battle groups and 12 ESGs, in addition to surface action groups. The concept ultimately was intended to nearly double the number of independent operational groups the Navy could deploy, from 19 to 38. The Peleliu ESG was also to be composed of amphibious transport dock Dubuque (LPD-8), dock landing ship Germantown (LSD-42), guided missile cruiser Port Royal (CG-73), guided missile destroyer Decatur (DDG-73), guided missile frigate Jarrett (FFG-33), and Topeka.

    On 11 February 2014, the Navy announced that Topeka was to be forward deployed to Naval Base Guam as part of the service’s long range plan to reposition its most advanced and capable ships and submarines. Topeka completed an engineering overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, N.H., and then sailed for the Marianas, reaching her new homeport on 29 May 2015. Her arrival marked the fourth submarine assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15.

    source: US Naval History & Heritage Command

    In 1993 the mini series Submarines: Sharks of Steel used the Topeka to produce segments of their program. During New Year's Eve 2000 the USS Topeka straddled the international dateline, thus was famously "in two millenniums at once".

    In October 2002, after completing a Modernization Period in Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Topeka shifted homeport to San Diego, California, from Pearl Harbor.

    In December 2012, the submarine began an overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Earlier that same year the submarine completed a six-month-long deployment in the Western Pacific, covering around 35,000 nautical miles.


    USS Topeka (CL-67) - History

    Diogenes-a steamer built in 1881 by George Howaldt at Kiel, Germany-was acquired by the Navy from the Thames Iron Works, London, England, on 2 April 1898 renamed Topeka, and placed in commission the same day, Lt. John J. Knapp in command.

    Topeka cleared Falmouth, England, on 19 April and arrived at Tompkinsville, N.Y., on 1 May. The following day, she moved to the New York Navy Yard to begin a two-month overhaul during which she received her armament and generally prepared for duty on the Cuban blockade. The gunboat departed New York on 30 June and after a five-day stop at Key West, Fla. joined the blockading forces off Havana on 11 July. That same day, she was assigned station off Bahia de Nipe, located on the northeastern shore of Cuba almost directly opposite Santiago de Cuba on the island's southeastern coast. On 17 July, she and Maple captured the Spanish sloop Domingo Aurelio off Bahia de Nipe. Four days later, Topeka joined Annapolis, Wasp and Leyden in a foray into Bahia de Nipe. The four warships encountered no real resistance from the Spanish and, therefore, easily captured the port and sank the Spanish cruiser Jorge Juan, abandoned by her crew.

    Following the capture of the Bahia de Nipe littoral Topeka steamed to Key West with dispatches. She returned to Cuban waters on 28 July and remained until 5 August, when she again steamed to Key West. She made one more voyage to Cuba in mid-August, visiting Port Francis on the 14th before heading north on the 15th. After stops at Key West and Hampton Roads, she visited Provincetown and Boston, Mass., and then arrived at the New York Navy Yard on 13 September. Topeka exited New York harbor on 22 October and reached Philadelphia the following day. She remained there until 19 November when she sailed for the Caribbean. During that cruise, she visited Cuba, Haiti San Domingo, and Puerto Rico before returning-via Norfolk and Newport, R.I.&mdashto Boston, Mass., early in February 1899. On 15 February 1899, Topeka was placed out of commission at the Boston Navy Yard.

    After 18 months of inactivity, the gunboat was recommissioned at Boston on 15 August 1900, Comdr. Francis H. Delano in command. She departed Boston on 19 September and, after a five-day stop at Tompkinsville, N.Y., embarked upon a training cruise to the Mediterranean Sea on 27 September. Steaming via the Azores and Lisbon, Portugal and Gibraltar, she entered the Mediterranean on i November. During the cruise, she visited Villefranche, Genoa, Leghorn, Naples, Algiers, and Tangier. Topeka transited the Straits of Gibraltar on 5 January 1901 and, after visits to the Azores and to St. Vincent and Barbados in the West Indies, returned to the United States at Hampton Roads, Va., on 4 March 1901.

    For more than a year, Topeka operated along the southeastern coast of the United States and in the West Indies, working out of Norfolk and the South Carolina ports of Charleston and Port Royal. On 16 May 1902, the gunboat cleared Port Royal and headed-via Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and San Juan, Puerto Rico-to the Caribbean for a summer training cruise in the waters off Venezuela. Over the next three months, when not conducting gunnery drills, she was a frequent caller at the Venezuelan ports of Puerto Cabello and La Guaira as well as at nearby Curacao in the Danish West Indies. She departed Puerto Cabello on 23 August 1902 and reached Hampton Roads on 5 September. That same day, she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for three months of repairs.

    On 10 December, Topeka completed repairs and departed Norfolk to join the fleet in the West Indies. She reached Culebra on the 16th and, for the following two months, conducted exercises in the West Indies and the Caribbean. On 21 February 1903, the ship got underway from Kingston, Jamaica, to return to the United States. She arrived Charelston SC on 1 March, and began operations along the length of the eastern seaboard. Those operations occupied her until late in the year.

    On 10 December, she steamed out of Hampton Roads to return south to the Caribbean Sea-Gulf of Mexico area. After a visit to New Orleans, La., between 16 and 22 December, she began duty with the Caribbean Squadron. In January and early February of 1904, she cruised along the coast of Panama in the wake of the revolution which separated that republic from Colombia and paved the way for the construction of the Panama Canal. During the latter part of February, Topeka visited Kingston, Jamaica Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and San Juan, Puerto Rico, before joining other units of the fleet off the coast of San Domingo late in the month. She plied the waters around Hispanola through the end of March protecting American lives and interests while civil strife tore the island asunder.

    Topeka left the West Indies on 30 March and returned to the United States upon her arrival at Charleston on the 5th. On 15 May, the warship reported for duty at Newport, R.I., and, for the next four months, participated in wireless telegraphy experiments conducted off the New England coast. During October and November, Topeka participated in the trials of three new warships-Colorado (Armored Cruiser No. 7), West Virginia (Armored Cruiser No. 5), and Pennsylvania (Armored Cruiser No. 4). Late in November, she resumed duty along the east coast.

    On 5 January 1905, Topeka stood out of Newport News, Va., to return to the West Indies. She stopped at Key West for 11 days, from 11 to 22 January and then continued on to Cuba. Between 23 and 25 January, the warship gathered hydrographic and commercial information at Havana. She coaled at Bahia de Nipe on the 27th and headed for Puerto Rico, where she trained with the North Atlantic Fleet until 17 February. She operated out of Guantanamo Bay from 19 February to 22 March and then headed back to the United States. After visits in Florida at Key West and Pensacola, Topeka arrived in Hampton Roads on 11 April. On the 23d, the gunboat again headed south to the troubled waters of the West Indies. She arrived off the Dominican Republic on the 28th and patrolled the coastline of that strife-torn country into August. On 13 August, the gunboat weighed anchor at Guantanamo Bay and shaped a course for Portsmouth, N.H., where she arrived on the 21st. Topeka was placed out of commission on 7 September 1905 and assigned duty as station ship at Portsmouth.

    She remained at Portsmouth-serving as station ship, auxiliary to Southery, and as a prison ship-until the summer of 1916. On 14 June 1916, she was recommissioned and moved to New York where she served as receiving ship until decommissioned again on 14 September. Two weeks later, she departed New York under tow by Uncas, and returned to Portsmouth. There, she served as a training ship for 1st Naval District recruits throughout the United States' participation in World War I.


    Watch the video: USS Topeka CL 67 WWII Cruise Book Preview (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Mikam

    This is the very precious coin

  2. Drummand

    remarkably, the very valuable idea

  3. Jenyd

    It is compliant, the piece is very good

  4. Warrick

    take away !!! ATP HUGE !!!!

  5. Ryscford

    Excuse for that I interfere... At me a similar situation. Write here or in PM.

  6. Kneph

    The agha, so seemed to me too.

  7. Benkamin

    I like this sentence :)



Write a message