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Is Malenkov wearing some sort of uniform in this picture?

Is Malenkov wearing some sort of uniform in this picture?


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Or just a mildly ridiculous sailor suit?

He is the third from the right.


  1. Listing of the people in the pic (just FYI): -- they constitute the closest and highest circle of Stalin's minions --
    • Anastas Mikoyan (ministry of trade/industry),
    • Nikita Khruschev (Moscow Party first secretary),
    • Iosif Stalin (the boss himself),
    • Georgiy Malenkov (vice-premier, Stalin's deputy),
    • Lavrentiy Beria (chief of NKVD, various other posts),
    • Vyacheslav Molotov (ministry of foreign affairs etc).

Photo taken (most likely) at some point in 1949 (Khruschev moved from Kiev to Moscow in 1949, and Molotov was demoted in 1949).

  1. The main idea was to wear a suit which was close enough to a military attire that Stalin was sporting. So it might look a bit ridiculous to us now but…

  2. So this kind of clothing was very popular at the time. Here is more pics of the same sort

Some party members in Orenburg

Malenkov and Beria on Lenin's Mausoleum


Uniforms of the German Civil War/Identifying the Factions.

In the German Civil War, I notice all the factions are practically wearing the same uniform. This is due all of the combatants being from the Wehrmacht splitting up into supporting Bormann, Speer and Goering.

Heydrich would be easy to spot due to the SS wearing different uniforms.

For Speer, he mainly employs Militias made up of Reformist Supporters who may or may not wear uniforms. Although he does have some sympathetic Wehrmacht join him, and well wearing similar/same uniforms may cause trouble. This is especially the case when most of Speer's armies are trigger-happy students who will likely shoot at anything wearing gray. However artwork shows them in Flecktarn.

How would they be able to identify each other? I mean wearing more or less the same uniform, how would they identify each other without risking possible friendly fire? I mean in Kaiserreich with ACW2, the AFP/AUS (Huey Long) and the CSA (John Reed) have time to prepare before the war to form militias and create their own identifiable symbols, flags and uniforms, however in TNO, everything falls apart before anyone has a chance to do anything.

I did notice the artwork showing Speerists dressed in Flecktarn Camo raising the Black-Red-Gold flag passing by a dead Wehrmacht Soldier (Can't tell if Goering or Bormann affiliated). And that prompted me to ask how they would identify. https://media.moddb.com/images/articles/1/249/248619/auto/rOz7SZx.jpg

Personally I feel Speer would have the flecktarn Heydrick would have SS as usual And goering and Bormann would have Wehrmacht units that would probably either use a different camo or maybe have something to identify them like blue ribbons or color coded shit, I understand what this is supposed to say but I don’t feel friendly fire would be as major an issue

They all use flecktarn. The reason there is flecktarn and grey in the picture is because it's not universal and not all regiments have been equipped with it. Some still stick with the old stuff, and a lot of the militias are forced to use old spares.

Exactly what i am thinking of , Speertard troops wearing some Flecktarn, or more commonly called, camos, as learned from the example of those bootleg USA / OFN styles. these camo are originally designed for SS troops in WWII as Splittermuster , but then, since the SS is more like style over practically, thus they probably ditched them well and instead wearing those goddamn SS uniforms.

Bormann, well, as boring Wehrmacht grey color since it equals to status quo
Goering, as being more flashy guy, perhaps their uniform is more ornate, and some style like Ältere Art (Old style) tunic would be their choice.

They all wear flecktarn or greys.

Although I would argue they wouldn't have the time to have distinct uniforms considering all the chaos before the Civil War.

Also the SS, I can see also deploy Flecktarn since Waffen-SS in OTL did wear its variant.

Speer- Flecktarn (Or just straight up c*m* from the *m*r*c*ns)

Heydrich- SS uniforms (or they fight naked since clothing is degenerate and unspartan)

Goering- Grey Wehrmacht uniforms (perhaps with more Prussian decorations)

Borman- Blue Wehrmacht uniforms (or maybe just normal uniforms since the Prussian stuff is enough to distinguish Goering's men)

Meinhoff- Black bloc clothes (or brownshirt uniforms but with a hammer/sickle instead of a swastika)

To clarify this picture, the dead Wehrmacht soldier is Bormann-aligned, due to the artist saying this is during a "Rush for Berlin" after Bormann (pompous ass that he is) breached Spiedel's neutrality zone, and is causing all the factions to fight for the capital.

It is more likely soldiers identify themselves via flags and insignias more than uniform colors, partially because they're all from the same army (barring the foreign volunteers and "pulled out off the streets" civilian militias for Speer, natch), partially because this is around the time color-coded uniforms get phased out for proper camouflage, i.e. To avoid getting shot to death.

Maybe Yugoslav war style colored armbands?

Bormann probably uses regular Feldgrau.

Speer uses Leibermuster and not Flecktarn But they probably also use Feldgrau along with it.

Goering probably uses Splintertarnmuster because Luftwaffe FTW.

And Heydrich of course uses a Standard SS Uniform.

The dead soldier I believe has been confirmed to be Speidel's Germania Garrison.

The Wehrmacht: loyalist factions would focus on efficiency and primarily use gear that gets the job done. Both the loyalists and the militarists would definitely use camo as they recognize it's importance. Camo that would differ depending on the respective military unit. For instance, Jaegers would have snow camo while the regulars use woodland and forestry camo. Here's a few pictures:

They're the most uniform of the bunch so they're not too striking. Now, Heydritch and Speer on the other hand.

The SS: the SS uses the highest quality arms and armor (due to their influence within the German government). And as a result, compensates their relatively small manpower pool with both heavy duty fire power and an extremely competent special forces department. But there's another thing the SS capitalizes on: demoralization. Heydritch uses the color black, the Totenkopf, skeleton imagery, and the neo-pagan symbolism as a means to trip out and terrify his opponents (however, keep in mind a lot of the SS has been stationed in Ostland and Burgundy, and that much of Heydritch's manpower pool are repurposed prison camp guards and party members who have never seen combat). Here's what I found:

Elements of the SS are very deadly and can be freaking terrifying, but they're let down by poor leadership and less than stellar units. Now. Sigh, Speer.

Speer: Speer has a few loyal Wehrmacht units but they're far from the majority. Oh no, most of his supporters are ramshackle student militias, left-wing terrorist organizations, Hitler Youth who went the way of the Red Guards from China's cultural revolution, poor people who were literally shanghaied and conscripted, the Manson family, and Meinhoff. Needless to say, these divisions are very noticeable with the multitude of competing factions bickering over who gets what gear. Gear that's mass produced, clandestine American, Burgundian, and Japanese aid. They frequently aren't wearing matching uniforms, and those that do are usually wearing their repurposed Werewolf, Hitler Young, and League of German Girl's clothing:

Kid's larping as soldiers, like it or not, there IS a cultural revolution feel to Speer.

Volksturmm, poor bastards who were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Werwolves, again, kid's larping as soldiers.

Student group, the backbone of Meinhoff's support.

They're outnumbered by Bormann, outgunned by Goering, outclassed by Heydritch, but they make up for it with sheer fanaticism and determination.


A Face Like a Catcher’s Mitt … On a Catcher’s Mitt!

The annual SABR convention is currently underway, and this year it’s in New York. I’m not attending, but lots of Uni Watch readers are (hi, Elena!), including the great Sean Kane. In case you don’t recognize Sean’s name, he’s the guy who does awesome paintings on vintage baseball gloves. He joined me last night at Susquehanna Industrial Tool and Die Co.’s monthly show and brought along a swell Yogi Berra glove for show and tell. Here’s a closer look at the glove:

How great is that? I particularly like how Sean interrupted the stripe across the center so the little illustration of the catcher was left untouched, and I continue to be amazed by his lettering, which is of near-typographic quality. Tremendous stuff.

Hanging out with Sean was the highlight of my night. But a close second was an appearance by her royal majesty Daisy the Chicken Queen (don’t ask), who hopped up onstage between songs to present a birthday cake to one of the audience members:

At first I thought Daisy’s jacket was just, you know, colorful. But upon closer inspection, I discovered that it was actually covered in Kwik Loks (or as they’re more commonly known, bread tags):

Longtime readers may recall that I wrote a story about the eternal tug of war between Kwik Loks and twist-ties for BusinessWeek back in 2013, so I was particularly enthralled by Daisy’s jacket, which she made herself. So cool!

ESPN reminder: In case you missed it yesterday, my latest ESPN piece features 10 things you might not know about the Astros’ classic rainbow uniforms. Check it out here.

Naming Wrongs reminder: We’ve made adjustments to the wording of the Murph and Ted shirts, and have also added several new Rose Garden shirts (in addition to the ones we already had). Get the full scoop here, or just go straight to the Naming Wrongs shop.

Research query: I’m trying to compile a list of players or groups of players who were uniform renegades or just eccentrics. The Fab Five and their black socks (shown at right) would be a good example. Others would include Joe Namath’s white shoes, LC Greenwood’s yellow shoes, Brooks Robinson’s truncated helmet brim, Frank Robinson’s stirrup extensions, Pedro Martinez’s slit sleeves, David Price’s squatchee-free cap, Manny Ramirez’s baggy pants, George Hendrick’s low-cuffed pants, Hunter Pence’s high-cuffed pants, Ezekiel Elliott’s crop-top jersey, and a lot more.

As you can see, some of these involve making modifications to the uniform, while others involve adding accessories. Some were influential and others were just limited to the one player. Some involve players that are currently active and some are from decades past. I’m interested in as many of these as we can come up with. Feel free to post them in today’s comments. Thanks.

The Ticker
By Paul

’Skins Watch: Back in 1963-64, there was a minor league hockey team whose logo showed a savage Indian marauder. The ironic thing is that the team was called the Denver Invaders (good one from CityBuffPete). … As had been expected last week’s Supreme Court decision allowing trademarks to be granted to potentially offensive terms means the ’Skins will retain their trademark rights.

Baseball News: The Yankees’ roster currently includes four players named Tyler. That prompted a really fun piece by longtime Uni Watch pal Tyler Kepner. … Unusual to see a tequila sunrise motif on a road grey uni (from Stan Capp). … This is pretty awesome: The Potomac Nationals are giving away a Tommy John surgery statue thingie (from @VictoryCB). … Lederhosen-style jerseys next weekend for the Bismarck Larks (from Jordan Oster). … D-backs SS Ketel Marte came to bat yesterday with the size sticker still on his throwback batting helmet.

NFL News: Here’s a really good investigative piece about that ongoing scandal involving game-used Giants gear and Eli Manning. It’s long but really well-written, and it provides a good look at all the corruption in the modern memorabilia scene. Highly recommended reading (from Tommy Turner). … Check out this shot from a 1959 Cardinals/Rams preseason game. Looks like Ram No. 58 has a white outline on his numbers while his teammates do not. According to the mighty Gridiron Uniform Database, the Rams used the outlined numbers in 1957 and the 1958 preseason, but not at all in 1959. So assuming the date of the photo is accurate (always a bit of a leap with Getty photos), No. 58 was probably wearing an old jersey carried over from 1957 (good spot by Eric Bangeman).

College Football News: New uniforms for Lamar. … New uniforms for Monmouth (from Mark Mohrman). … The tequila sunrise look even extended to the Georgia Tech cheerleaders back in 1979. … In case you couldn’t figure out UNLV’s new logo, they’ve diagrammed it for you.

Hockey News: The official puck of the IIHF Inline Hockey World Championship is pretty weird-looking (from John Muir). … Speaking of the inline tourney, Slovenia appears to be wearing something akin to Cooperalls (from Bob Addison). … Whoa, check out the amazing jersey worn by the Minnesota State Mavericks in the early 1980s! (Big thanks to Paul Allan.) … New uniforms for the Knoxville Ice Bears (from Mike Campos). … Players at the Penguins’ prospect camp were wearing Reebok practice jerseys yesterday. … Here’s a good look at the Vegas home and road uniforms together (from Patrick Thomas).

Basketball News: The Mavericks will have a darker shade of blue this fall. … The Knicks misspelled Frank Ntilikina’s NOB on his first practice jersey with the team — possibly because they reused an old Jeremy Lin jersey. … New floor in the works for the University of Jamestown (from Greg Enkers).

Grab Bag: Beginning tomorrow, hunters in Virginia will be permitted to wear blaze pink vests (from Gregory Koch). … The Team Sky cycling team is using NOBs, which is atypical for cycling (from Ted Taylor). … You can now own a mock turtleneck similar to the ones Steve Jobs wore for a mere $270 (blame Brinke). … The PGA website has a version of apparel tracking called “The Style Insider” (from Rex Henry). … I still call it the Tappan Zee.

The Independence Day weekend unofficially begins this afternoon for many people. If you’re traveling, travel safe. And for our Canadian readers, happy Canada Day! Phil will be here tomorrow and Sunday, as usual, and I’ll be back on Monday. See you then.


The Reveal-Part Two

Amy said when she first got here, she came inside through the back and she could feel the presence of others as soon as she entered the mud room. She walked through the house to get a feel of it and then straight through the front door. As she was standing on the front porch, she could see a line of dead people walking back and forth in front of our house. She said there were hundreds of them. While she's there, two black figures (not sure if she said shadow figures) just charged at her. They were angry, aggressive, and wanted to hurt her. They didn't want to necessarily be in the house but they did want to be on the property. The figures were solid and very physical. She said if someone were to get in their way, they could get hurt because these figures were quite capable of doing so. Amy felt that they had some sort ties to the property like a claim on it. There had been times that we would hear tapping on our front windows and the storm door on the front door would shake. She said that was them either trying to draw us out or they wanted inside.

I mentioned to Amy that once I saw a man slowly walking, dragging a rifle by the barrel. He was wearing a uniform of some sort. Amy asked if I could tell what kind of uniform. I told her it was a civil war era uniform but I couldn't tell if it was Union or Confederate. She said that was interesting because she felt the figures who charged her had some sort of connection to the Civil War.

Amy said that when she went into the barn and looked out into the back pasture, she saw a man walking. As he walked, he changed into different stages of his life until he finally got to the stage of his passing. She said he died in the house of some sort of breathing problem and that the energy she saw was just residual.

Amy then told us about her time in the house. As she walked inside she encountered a male who was very tall and wearing a cowboy hat. She felt he was from the Western times. Amy got the sense that he had done some terrible things in his life murder, robbery, setting fires. He was very aggressive and physical. He didn't die on the property but had some sort of ties to our land, either directly or indirectly. He was "pissed" because he felt that someone in the house, a living person, trapped him here. He would stand in the back corner of the open bedroom where Jennifer and I slept. He was trying to figure a way to get revenge on the person who he felt trapped him. Amy told us he was watching us sleep and at times we could see him as some sort of shadow figure. She also said that being in the room would be uncomfortable.

Steve told Amy that we had issues in that room and we shared with her the things that had happened to us. Jennifer said the room made each of us uncomfortable and that one time we saw a shadow figure walk through the room. She also told Amy that she would wake up with bruises on her upper arm, like someone was grabbing her and trying to drag her out of bed. Jennifer also shared that one time someone picked her legs up by the ankles and violently slammed them down on the bed. I told Amy that I had felt someone grab my ankles and pull me down off the end of the bed by about two feet. I even told her about the time I heard the boot steps walk from the back of the house, past the open bedroom and into the living room. Steve asked Amy if the guy could do that, and her response was "Yes. and it's going to get much worse."

Steve asked us to share with Amy about the time we brought in the paranormal team for help (see blog post "We Work With The Dead Files & We're Here to Help. Well Sort of.") I will never forget the look on Amy's face as we told her about that experience and how we made the team cleanse our house. She said they may have done a blotched cleansing that is what he feels trapped him.

She tells us she had a sketch done of the guy and when we saw it, I was shocked to see the same guy I saw on our property once before. I immediately start talking about our horse we had to put down and that one evening I saw the same guy from the sketch standing next to where we buried her. As I approached him, he said, "just paying my respects." and he walked through the fence and faded away. Amy asked me if I could tell what he was wearing because she just saw him wearing some kind of robe like a church choir robe. I said that I thought it was a western style decorative poncho.

The Sketch of the Hat Man

This poncho is similar to the one I saw the Hat Man wearing.
Steve spoke about a man named William Wade who once owned the property. His brother, David Wade, and two nephews, Newton and Samuel, served with the Quantrill's Raiders. They were specifically in William "Bloody Bill" Anderson's unit. We all looked on as Steve showed the pictures of the Wades' and a couple of Bloody Bill. He describes the things that Anderson did and how he was killed. He also told us that David survived the war but Newton and Samuel were both killed in action. All of these men had likely stayed on our property as Clay County, MO was very supportive of Quantrill and his men.

Steve asked Amy is anyone in the picture looks familiar. She pointed to David Wade and said the only one that sticks out is "this dude. But it could have been him", she said as she pointed to the picture of Anderson. She also said that the two black figures that charged her could have been the other two (Newton and Samuel) but she couldn't say for certain.

Steve asks me to tell Amy about what happened to me when the paranormal team was here. I told her about they called out to the dead. I remember the shock on her face as she said, "You never command the dead, you only use that when you're commanding them to leave." I told her about how I was picked up and thrown into the wall.

Steve asked Amy, "Is this something this guy could do?"

"Yes. that's something someone like this would do, torture and if he traps you somewhere else it will be worse than that."

So now we have a ruthless western era outlaw, David Wade or Bill Anderson, in our house. The feeling of helplessness rushes over me because I felt that even if I could see this guy, I couldn't take him.

I could tell that Jennifer was starting to get upset as she heard the news that the paranormal team might have trapped a sadistic manic in our home. It felt like having a wild animal locked inside with us and it was capable of killing any of us at the drop of a hat.

Jennifer and I were already starting to feel emotionally drained. We didn't expect to hear that someone who was so terrible in life was in our home with our girls. I was scared before but now I was petrified. How was I going to protect my family? How could I beat this thing?

I had hope that we had heard the worse but when Steve asked Amy, "I'm afraid to ask if you saw anything else, but did ya?"

I knew by the tone of how she said, "yea, I did." That we were about to hear something far more frightening and worse.


Rank Insignia and Uniforms Thread

Well, I'll use one of my templates and work on that. It sounds interesting. What are their national colours, so I can have something to work from?

In the meantime, here's an example of camouflage uniforms (based of real-life camo) used by the CGU Army during the Zaaroft War, also called the Magellanic War. While a greenish-grey was the production standard for the M92 uniform, various environments required different camouflage colours. Due to the war extending itself into Union space on the edge of the Milky Way, traditional camouflage patterns became especially useful. This shows digital and flecktarn patterns for autumn and winter. The soldier also displays low-visibility buttons and insignia made from duller material, standard for combat use.

Slings_Arrows

european soldiers of POD 1800 timeline

using hapburgs template with soldiers of austria, holland, prussia, vaenice, bavria, spain, italy, great britain, denmark-norway, and france

Slings_Arrows

I found this picture on DeviantArt and decided to do my own take. The rifle is an Enfield, I don't have a Springfield1903

Beedok

From Left to Right:
Standard Infantry for the Alliance of Eden's Children
Standard Infantry for the Provences of Terra
Standard Infantry for the Cererians Reich

MadMc

Chainsaw bayonet AND a sword, why would he ever need to shoot

Beedok

Chainsaw bayonet AND a sword, why would he ever need to shoot

Krall

Beedok

Hapsburg

Psycho Mantis vs. Fusiliers With Stahlhems v.s Knight of the Colourful Order of Colour.

(Terran Sphere) Intersteller Protectorate Naval Uniform (officers). While military inspired fasion is common across the protectorate and the Governing Corps is notable for having fairly elaborate uniforms, the Protectorate's Military has a fairly straightforward design. The Protectorate's symbol is a square tower sheild with a spear, representing the ancient military practice of the shield wall, which symbolises the nessesity of co-operation, order and discipline in overcomming threats.

Hapsburg

Using a template I fixed up quick (based partly on SA uniforms for shape, but not entirely), I have made a large table of the various official uniforms of the CGU's civil service. The Civil Service is a vast bureaucracy spanning fifteen Reich Ministries, over a hundred agencies and bureaus, and literally millions of offices on every inhabited planet or moon, at every level of administration. Employees number around a trillion, around 5% of the human population. By far the largest group of civil servants are those of the Stormguard organisation, which primarily provides internal security and law enforcement across Union space, but also maintains a reserve pool of public employees that can be assigned to other branches of the civil service as-needed. Second in size is the Ministry of the Interior, which possesses broad powers over internal administration and governance. Both the Interior Ministry and the Stormguard are headed by the same person.

This table shows but a few examples of uniforms from this broad sector of employment. To ease understanding, I will explain what ministry they each belong to.
First row: Ministry of Education and Science Ministry of Communication other two are Interior Ministry. Second row: Ministry of the Interior, Ministry of Health Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Transportation. Third row: Ministry of the Interior Ministry of Finance Ministry of the Interior Ministry of Agriculture. Fourth row is all Stormguard.

LSCatilina

I'm not quite sure that my request should put it in this thread, but.

Someone could make a VIII-IX medieval horseman with
-traditionnal western lamellar armour
-light round shield
-lance
-spangenhelm

Beedok

High sub-general officers for the Provences of Terra and the three most powerful Autonomus Provences.

Hapsburg

Using a template I made (which I will share if anyone wants me to), a table of ten CGUA camouflage patterns. Obviously, it's not all the patterns they have. Merely some of the most common wilderness types. The CGU Army issues combat uniforms on a mission-centric basis, distributed to troops on-board a carrier prior to beginning a land operation.
This table shows a Private of the infantry in modified M92 battledress, wielding an AR-38E battle rifle using a proprietary 12.7mm round rather than the AR-38's usual 7.92mm cartridge.

Archangel Michael

From l - r (all command & staff division): Imperial StarFleet major (OF-3), Surface Operations Command Regular Forces Office major (OF-3), Air Force squadron leader (OF-3) and SeaPatrol major (OF-3) (not show: Surface Operations Command Life Guards office and Office of Homeland Security's National Guard).

These are the uniforms of the military of the Imperial Earth Sphere (the only exceptions are the elite Life Guards and the National Guard). They were first adopted during the Ear of the Unyielding Truth and have and they've changed very little since then. These uniforms are worn by officers and senior non-coms while on duty (though they may be replaced with Joint Service Work Uniforms) and junior non-coms on specific duties and times (junior non-coms wear berets instead of field caps). Females may wear skirts instead of slacks.

They are a mixture of the Imperial uniforms from Star Wars and Federation Starfleet uniforms from Star Trek. The rank insignia is based off the rank system used by the Empire in A New Hope, just streamlined and made logical. Special thanks to Tounushi for use of his template and Imperial caps.


Need help with uniforms

I am doing a piece of artwork as a surprise for someone who does civil war reenactments, so I wish to be as accurate as possible. Please forgive my lack of knowledge in this area. but I am trying to determine the exact insignia that would have been used on the forage style union cap. I find crossed saber, rifles and a bugle. as well as nothing at all. Where some of these only used in officers, etc? With a totally different hat? I don't wish to mix things up. if this style hat was only used in enlisted, I don't want to put officer insignia on it and so on. Also if you could point me to a website with pictures that would be most welcome! Thanks for any guidance!

This is just a quick description of CW headgear. Hope it helps. If this doesn't answer your question, let me know. I can get more info.

Hardee hat - Aka "Jeff Davis Hat". Black with eagle badge keeping the left side of the brim pinned up. For parades an eagle feather was added, with brass designating the soldier's regiment, company and branch of service (bugle for infantry, cannons for artillery or sabres for cavalry).Western units like the Iron Brigade preferred the Hardee hat as its wide brim provided protection from the sun and rain. These hats were personalised by the men, usually shaped into civilian styles like the centercrease, which was the precursor of the cowboy hat.

Kepis were worn on campaign and for fatigue duty. The design varied from a tight-fitting cap resembling the one adopted by the French in the 1840s to a tall floppy "bummer's cap" described by the troops as resembling a feedbag. The leather peak could be stiff and rectangular or crescent shaped (known as the McDowell pattern). The hat band was sometimes a contrasting color to the normal blue: yellow for cavalry, red for artillery or green for medics and soldiers belonging to the Irish Brigade. Officers' kepis might have black or gold braid to display their rank. Early in the war kepis were supplied with a waterproof cover. Other troops purchased a "havelock" which, like the contemporary Foreign Legion cap had a neck flap to protect the wearer from the sun. The havelock was made of a greyish-blue cotton mesh and was not liked by the troops, who usually used them to filter tea or coffee. So their issue was discontinued in the later years.

Many troops would replace their regulation kepis with civilian hats (normally in black). Popular styles included the slouch hat with either a flat or round top (the latter was issued to the Garibaldi Guard with black feathers added to resemble the Italian bersaglieri hat), pork pie hat, telescope crown hat, flat cap, bowler hat or smoking cap (worn in camp when off-duty)

Marines were issued tall leather shakos before the war but in the field these were replaced with kepis (often with the red enamelled brass M badge from the shako added)

Early in the war the M1839 forage cap which was officially phased out in 1858 was still in use among some regular soldiers.


Volkssturm weaponry

Post by Matt Walker » 31 Jul 2006, 18:23

Does anyone have a comprehensive list of the various small arms issued to and used by the Volkssturm?

Post by Rogerbutthead » 31 Jul 2006, 21:40

Take a look at the book "Desperate Measures" by D Weaver.

Although the Germans tried to produce alot of their own weapons, like the VG1, VK98 etc., I remember the book stating that Italian Carcanos were the most numerous weapons in the hands of the Volksstrum.

Post by scarecrow » 01 Aug 2006, 01:40

Post by Gunitz » 01 Aug 2006, 18:53

and don´t forgot the panzerfausts

carcanos, i dont know about, thx for the information.

and a question, the volkssturm have any tipe of uniform? or only a bandana?

Post by PPoS » 01 Aug 2006, 21:18

and don´t forgot the panzerfausts

carcanos, i dont know about, thx for the information.

and a question, the volkssturm have any tipe of uniform? or only a bandana?

Post by Matt Walker » 01 Aug 2006, 22:04

Post by Rogerbutthead » 01 Aug 2006, 22:04

There are numerous pictures of them in Desperate Measures. Old men and boys in civilian clothing with armbands. Some had some type of uniform. Most just had what they wore everyday.

Some of them on the Eastern Front fought very well, considering their lack of training and ammunition. (stories of rape and murder by the Soviets probably led to that) However most did not fight very well, and on the Western Front, I do not remember any stories of them putting up noticable resistance.

They did well to survive the war.

Post by Maigewitter » 01 Aug 2006, 22:30

Ok heres the pic with the Carcanos (Karabiner 409 (i) ) from the "Germans with captured firearms" thread


Also the Panzerfaust was often used against the opposing tanks

The Gauleiter(s) were strived to organize the Volkssturm very soldierly as a personal army. So especially the lack of uniforms bothered them and they tried to get some uniforms for "his soldiers" (often on illegal ways..). The Gauleiter of Wartheland even ordered 130.000m of uniform cloth on the italian black market but they didnt arrived soon enough, the Red Army was faster.

Here's a pic of a dead Battaillon Leader, it seems that he is wearing some kind of uniform, maybe he managed to get a "real" uniform to his collar tabs:

All Volkssturm soldiers, regardless of rank, were compelled to provide for their individual uniforms and equipment. The consequence was a wide variety of Wehrmacht uniforms, worn especially by retired officers, of uniforms of all branches, etc., of the Party, and of civilian garments, but with the armband as the only common identifying insignia. Any variety of clothing was the usual order of the day for training. For battle employment more uniform clothing was issued, usually consisting of re-dyed Party uniforms or of Wehrmacht uniforms - the latter often out-modelled or even no longer serviceable uniforms.

Medical service was regulated by order No. 393/44 of the Party Chancellory, dated 9 November 1944. All members of the medical service had to wear the army-style red cross armband on the left upper sleeves.

ARMBANDS
A large variety of armbands used to identify members of the Volkssturm have been identified in photographs. A black/white/red armband was the most common pattern, and probably the official one. Many different patterns were placed into actual service, probably due to supply shortages of the official pattern, and were often of local production. The usual manner of the left lower sleeve. Locally produced armbands varied in color and measurements, and were in all cases of the printed variety.
The official pattern armband was a printed black/white/red band measuring 7 cm wide. The basic band was with a 1.2 cm wide red border stripe top and bottom, a 3.5 mm wide black stripe, a 2.5 mm wide white stripe on each outer edge of a 3.4 cm wide black center stripe. On the wide black field was the inscription "Deutscher Volkssturm/Wehrmacht" in Latin capitals measuring 1.3cm high, and in two lines. On either side of the white inscription was a white national emblem of the "Reichsadler" pattern, i.e., with outstretched wings measuring 2.9 cm wide. The heads of the eagles varied, with both looking to the right, to the left, outward or inward - even without eagles. The wing pattern of the eagle also differed, e.g., rounded or straight ends.

Other variations existed. A variety of materials were used such as rayon, silk, cotton, and even linen tablecloth! Even the "Deutsche Wehrmacht" in black on a yellow field (and variants) as prescribed for wear by civilian Wehrmacht employees was also worn.

RANK INSIGNIA
Rank insignia were introduced by order No. 318/44. Rank insignia of the Wehrmacht pattern were substituted by an entirely different system of rank identification modeled after the rank system utilized by the branches of the Party. The collar insignia, identical to those in use by the SS and NSKK, took the form of a black rhomboid measuring 5x6 cm in size, bearing one to four aluminum-colored pips according to the rank appointment, and sewn onto both corners of the collar of the tunic and greatcoat. For want of collar patches (or collar tabs), the pips were sometimes affixed directly onto the collar in the same pattern as prescribed for the collar patch. Collar patches have been observed piped with a twist aluminum cord or unpiped.

The rank insignia were as follows: Volkssturmmann = no pips Gruppenfuehrer = one pip centered Zugfuehrer, Waffenmeister (Ordnance master) and Zahlmeister (Paymaster) = two pips diagonally near the forward lower and rear upper corners Kompaniefuehrer, Ordonnanceoffizier and Adjutant = 3 pips diagonally as above Bataillonsfuehrer = four pips positioned in each corner. The collar insignia were worn in a mirror image

Medical personnel ranks were established in accordance with order No. 393/44 dated 9 November 1944 as follows: Sanitaetsdienstgrad (Medical Sergeant) = 1 pip Bataillonsarzt (Battalion Medical Officer) = 3 pips and a caduceus of white metal to the rear of the patches.

GORGETS
Gorget "PANZERWARNDIENST" (Tank Warning Service) was a special gorget bearing the inscription "PANZERWARNDIENST" stenciled in luminous paint on a breast plate in the form of the standard Feldgendarmerie (Military Police), and with a political national emblem at the top has been attributed to Warning Organization" during the closing months of the war. The existence of western frontier of the Reich) and a specimen of the gorget found in Prague would tend to verify such an organization.

COLORS
By order No. 358/44 of the Party Chancellory, dated 30 October 1944, all Volksturm battalions recieved colors. As the colors had to be supplied by the Party, they were of the basic Party form, i.e., black swastika on a white circular field on a red field. "With regard of local traditions" and by decision of the Kreisleiter, colors of the various branches and institutions of the Party were to be bestowed, not only the colors of the local branches.

All battalion colors had to bear the black patch on the lower inner corners, displaying the number of the respective region of the battalion, e.g. "14/115," of the district, with letters measuring 6 cm high, done in machine embroidery. The patches with the name of the local branch and respective number which were positioned at the upper inner corners of all Party colors were retained.

INSIGNIA OF "STANDSCHUETZEN" BATTALIONS
Local rifle associations known as "Standschuetzen" existed in northern and southern Tyrolia and in Vorarlberg, all provinces of the pre-1918 Austrian Empire. According to century old traditional prerogatives, the Standschuetzen were called up for the defense of their home country in case of war, and had the status of a territorial militia. For example, in 1915 after Italy declared war on Austria by attacking Tyrolia, the Standschuetzen were mobilized to defend their mountain frontiers since nearly all the regular Austrian forces were engaged on the East Front fighting the Russians. The Standschuetzen were regarded and organized as rifle clubs or associations during peacetime, and did not have any specific military training. In rememberance of the old traditions, the Volkssturm units of Tyrolia and Vorarlberg were bestowed the name "Standschuetzen," and recieved special identification badges worn on the left upper sleeve. The Edelweiss insignia of the type worn by mountain troops was often worn on the left side of the mountain cap.

The badge was a dark green cloth diamond measuring 10.5 cm high and 7.5 cm wide. A red stylized Tirolian eagle was at the top, below which was the designation in lime green "STANDSCHUETZEN/BATAILLON/(location name)" in three lines. A white or yellow border outlined the diamond shape. The machine embroidered insignia were worn on the upper left sleeve. The following towns thus far have been found bearing the Standschuetzen distinctive - (southern Tyrolia): MERAN, BOZEN, BRIXEN, SILANDER, (northern Tyrolia): INNSBRUCK, SCHWAZ, REUTTE, KUFTSTEIN, IMST, (Vorarlberg): DORNBIRN and BREGENZ. Positive evidence exists that members of the standschuetzen wore unit insignia on the right collar and ranks insignia on the left. The unit designation was machine-embroidered in lime green on a dark green wool rhomboid. In addition to the specimens encountered, yet another has been found bearing the designation "LI/11." It should be noted that, following standard German military practice, the Roman numeral indicates a battalion and the Arabic numeral indicates a company. It is interesting to note that the significance of the collar patches being green rather than black was due to the fact that these units were raised by the Police and not by the Nazi Party.

FREIKORPS SAUERLAND
The Freikorps Sauerland was established by order of the Gauleiter of Gau Westphalia-South even prior to the constitution of the Volkssturm, albeit by preliminary staff work and by selection of suitable cadre personnel. After official constitution of the Volkssturm, it was fully established and incorporated into the Volkssturm, comprising several battalions and, as exception of the general rule, even regimental staffs. For every district, only one battalion was raised. This and the order to accept only volunteers indicate the idea of an elite status within the Volkssturm.

All units of the Freikorps were issued field grey or brown uniforms, the latter presumbly stocks or cloth from the Organization Todt or those from the Reicharbeitdienst ("RAD"). However, other uniform parts were said to have been used. Special insignia were established by the Gauleiting consisting of a white cuff title bearing the inscription (in black?) "Freikorps Sauerland" and a sleeve insignia was sometimes worn as a decal on the left side of the steel helmets.

The sleeve badge was printed on thin white cloth. The bluish-green shield measured 6.3 cm in height and 5.6 cm in width, and was rounded below with straight lateral and upper edges, bordered by black, white and black stripes of 1 mm each. The center displayed a white circle of 4.5 cm in diameter, with a black "mobile" swastika with three blue-green oakleaves (3 x 2.7 cm) shaded in black and with white center ribs. Between the circle and the lower edge was the white, semicircular inscription "Sauerland" in Gothic letters.

HEADGEAR
The Volkssturm was to strive for unity in headdress caps in the style of those worn by the army and political visorless garrison caps (Einsatzmuetze der NSDAP) similar to those worn by the SA-Wehrmannschaften and NSKK were most often used. A national emblem was worn on the front of the headdress. According to photographic evidence of Volkssturm personnel, the most common caps in use were the Army Mountain Troops caps that are commonly and loosely referred to as the "M-43" by collectors. Hitler Youth, Luftwaffe, Organization Todt, various Party organizations, and even civilian versions of the Mountain Troop's cap were used as well. A combination of Army and Luftwaffe cloth and metal cap insignia were utilized. Even NSDAP insignia consisting of the Party eagle and cockade were used from the Political Leader's visored dress caps and found on the "M-43" style and overseas caps. Volkssturm officers also used the "M-43" style caps as well as surplus Army officer's visored field (M-34 "crusher style") and dress caps. Pre-, E arly-, and Late-war styles of the Army and Luftwaffe overseas cap were found to be extensively used as well. It is also important to note that not all "M-43" style caps and other headdress necessarily have had to have insignia, for many Volkssturm members were photographed without any insignia!

Helmets utilized by the Volkssturm came in all shapes and sizes. The most common were the Wehrmacht steel helmets from the M35 to M42 series, however, those from the Great War were used as well, such as the M1916 and M1918 steel helmets. Helmets from the civilian and civil organizations were used as well. These ranged from the Luftschutz "Gladiator Style" to fire and police helmets. Early on in the War the Luftschutz (Air Raid Warning Service) began utilizing captured enemy helmets, the most common being the French "Adrian" style and the Soviet M1936 and M1940 helmets. By the latter part of 1944 these captured stocks of the Luftschutz were later transferred to the Volkssturm to compensate for the dwindling supply of Wehrmacht steel helmets Many helmets didn't bear any insignia except those previuosly used by another organization, such as the Luftschutz, fire/police, and Wehrmacht. Some Volkssturm formations had their unit designations painted directly onto their helmets. The shortages of war deemed that an enormous variety of headdress was worn by the Volkssturm. It can be literally said that anything was possible regarding what sort of uniform was worn.

Post by Animal » 18 Sep 2006, 10:16

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT OF THE VOLKSSTURM
Compiled by: A.M. de Quesada


.
UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT Uniform and equipment were regulated by the afore-mentioned order No. 318/44 "Every kind of uniforms and weatherproof sports and working clothing" was permitted, with emphasis on durable shoes and greatcoats. The Gauleiter was required to provide "all dispensable stocks" of uniforms, i.e., uniforms of branches, etc., of the Party. The brown (in various shades) Party uniforms were to be re-dyed into a "color usable in the field," i.e., some shade of field-grey. Branch colors or other identifying insignia were not introduced. Common insignia for all Volkssturm soldiers was an armband bearing the inscription "Deutscher Volkssturm-Wehrmacht," which was to be issued by the Reichsfuehrer-SS, to be worn when performing duty as a member of the Volkssturm.

Equipment was restricted to "the most necessary items." As minimum equipment possession of a rucksack or backpack, blanket, field bag, messkit, canteen, cup, knife, fork and spoon was considered essential.

All Volkssturm soldiers, regardless of rank, were compelled to provide for their individual uniforms and equipment. The consequence was a wide variety of Wehrmacht uniforms, worn especially by retired officers, of uniforms of all branches, etc., of the Party, and of civilian garments, but with the armband as the only common identifying insignia. Any variety of clothing was the usual order of the day for training. For battle employment more uniform clothing was issued, usually consisting of re-dyed Party uniforms or of Wehrmacht uniforms - the latter often out-modelled or even no longer serviceable uniforms.

Medical service was regulated by order No. 393/44 of the Party Chancellory, dated 9 November 1944. All members of the medical service had to wear the army-style red cross armband on the left upper sleeves.

ARMBANDS
A large variety of armbands used to identify members of the Volkssturm have been identified in photographs. A black/white/red armband was the most common pattern, and probably the official one. Many different patterns were placed into actual service, probably due to supply shortages of the official pattern, and were often of local production. The usual manner of the left lower sleeve. Locally produced armbands varied in color and measurements, and were in all cases of the printed variety.
The official pattern armband was a printed black/white/red band measuring 7 cm wide. The basic band was with a 1.2 cm wide red border stripe top and bottom, a 3.5 mm wide black stripe, a 2.5 mm wide white stripe on each outer edge of a 3.4 cm wide black center stripe. On the wide black field was the inscription "Deutscher Volkssturm/Wehrmacht" in Latin capitals measuring 1.3cm high, and in two lines. On either side of the white inscription was a white national emblem of the "Reichsadler" pattern, i.e., with outstretched wings measuring 2.9 cm wide. The heads of the eagles varied, with both looking to the right, to the left, outward or inward - even without eagles. The wing pattern of the eagle also differed, e.g., rounded or straight ends.

Other variations existed. A variety of materials were used such as rayon, silk, cotton, and even linen tablecloth! Even the "Deutsche Wehrmacht" in black on a yellow field (and variants) as prescribed for wear by civilian Wehrmacht employees was also worn.

RANK INSIGNIA
Rank insignia were introduced by order No. 318/44. Rank insignia of the Wehrmacht pattern were substituted by an entirely different system of rank identification modeled after the rank system utilized by the branches of the Party. The collar insignia, identical to those in use by the SS and NSKK, took the form of a black rhomboid measuring 5x6 cm in size, bearing one to four aluminum-colored pips according to the rank appointment, and sewn onto both corners of the collar of the tunic and greatcoat. For want of collar patches (or collar tabs), the pips were sometimes affixed directly onto the collar in the same pattern as prescribed for the collar patch. Collar patches have been observed piped with a twist aluminum cord or unpiped.

The rank insignia were as follows: Volkssturmmann = no pips Gruppenfuehrer = one pip centered Zugfuehrer, Waffenmeister (Ordnance master) and Zahlmeister (Paymaster) = two pips diagonally near the forward lower and rear upper corners Kompaniefuehrer, Ordonnanceoffizier and Adjutant = 3 pips diagonally as above Bataillonsfuehrer = four pips positioned in each corner. The collar insignia were worn in a mirror image

Medical personnel ranks were established in accordance with order No. 393/44 dated 9 November 1944 as follows: Sanitaetsdienstgrad (Medical Sergeant) = 1 pip Bataillonsarzt (Battalion Medical Officer) = 3 pips and a caduceus of white metal to the rear of the patches.

GORGETS
Gorget "PANZERWARNDIENST" (Tank Warning Service) was a special gorget bearing the inscription "PANZERWARNDIENST" stenciled in luminous paint on a breast plate in the form of the standard Feldgendarmerie (Military Police), and with a political national emblem at the top has been attributed to Warning Organization" during the closing months of the war. The existence of western frontier of the Reich) and a specimen of the gorget found in Prague would tend to verify such an organization.

COLORS
By order No. 358/44 of the Party Chancellory, dated 30 October 1944, all Volksturm battalions recieved colors. As the colors had to be supplied by the Party, they were of the basic Party form, i.e., black swastika on a white circular field on a red field. "With regard of local traditions" and by decision of the Kreisleiter, colors of the various branches and institutions of the Party were to be bestowed, not only the colors of the local branches.

All battalion colors had to bear the black patch on the lower inner corners, displaying the number of the respective region of the battalion, e.g. "14/115," of the district, with letters measuring 6 cm high, done in machine embroidery. The patches with the name of the local branch and respective number which were positioned at the upper inner corners of all Party colors were retained.

INSIGNIA OF "STANDSCHUETZEN" BATTALIONS
Local rifle associations known as "Standschuetzen" existed in northern and southern Tyrolia and in Vorarlberg, all provinces of the pre-1918 Austrian Empire. According to century old traditional prerogatives, the Standschuetzen were called up for the defense of their home country in case of war, and had the status of a territorial militia. For example, in 1915 after Italy declared war on Austria by attacking Tyrolia, the Standschuetzen were mobilized to defend their mountain frontiers since nearly all the regular Austrian forces were engaged on the East Front fighting the Russians. The Standschuetzen were regarded and organized as rifle clubs or associations during peacetime, and did not have any specific military training. In rememberance of the old traditions, the Volkssturm units of Tyrolia and Vorarlberg were bestowed the name "Standschuetzen," and recieved special identification badges worn on the left upper sleeve. The Edelweiss insignia of the type worn by mountain troops was often worn on the left side of the mountain cap.

The badge was a dark green cloth diamond measuring 10.5 cm high and 7.5 cm wide. A red stylized Tirolian eagle was at the top, below which was the designation in lime green "STANDSCHUETZEN/BATAILLON/(location name)" in three lines. A white or yellow border outlined the diamond shape. The machine embroidered insignia were worn on the upper left sleeve. The following towns thus far have been found bearing the Standschuetzen distinctive - (southern Tyrolia): MERAN, BOZEN, BRIXEN, SILANDER, (northern Tyrolia): INNSBRUCK, SCHWAZ, REUTTE, KUFTSTEIN, IMST, (Vorarlberg): DORNBIRN and BREGENZ. Positive evidence exists that members of the standschuetzen wore unit insignia on the right collar and ranks insignia on the left. The unit designation was machine-embroidered in lime green on a dark green wool rhomboid. In addition to the specimens encountered, yet another has been found bearing the designation "LI/11." It should be noted that, following standard German military practice, the Roman numeral indicates a battalion and the Arabic numeral indicates a company. It is interesting to note that the significance of the collar patches being green rather than black was due to the fact that these units were raised by the Police and not by the Nazi Party.

FREIKORPS SAUERLAND
The Freikorps Sauerland was established by order of the Gauleiter of Gau Westphalia-South even prior to the constitution of the Volkssturm, albeit by preliminary staff work and by selection of suitable cadre personnel. After official constitution of the Volkssturm, it was fully established and incorporated into the Volkssturm, comprising several battalions and, as exception of the general rule, even regimental staffs. For every district, only one battalion was raised. This and the order to accept only volunteers indicate the idea of an elite status within the Volkssturm.

All units of the Freikorps were issued field grey or brown uniforms, the latter presumbly stocks or cloth from the Organization Todt or those from the Reicharbeitdienst ("RAD"). However, other uniform parts were said to have been used. Special insignia were established by the Gauleiting consisting of a white cuff title bearing the inscription (in black?) "Freikorps Sauerland" and a sleeve insignia was sometimes worn as a decal on the left side of the steel helmets.

The sleeve badge was printed on thin white cloth. The bluish-green shield measured 6.3 cm in height and 5.6 cm in width, and was rounded below with straight lateral and upper edges, bordered by black, white and black stripes of 1 mm each. The center displayed a white circle of 4.5 cm in diameter, with a black "mobile" swastika with three blue-green oakleaves (3 x 2.7 cm) shaded in black and with white center ribs. Between the circle and the lower edge was the white, semicircular inscription "Sauerland" in Gothic letters.

HEADGEAR
The Volkssturm was to strive for unity in headdress caps in the style of those worn by the army and political visorless garrison caps (Einsatzmuetze der NSDAP) similar to those worn by the SA-Wehrmannschaften and NSKK were most often used. A national emblem was worn on the front of the headdress. According to photographic evidence of Volkssturm personnel, the most common caps in use were the Army Mountain Troops caps that are commonly and loosely referred to as the "M-43" by collectors. Hitler Youth, Luftwaffe, Organization Todt, various Party organizations, and even civilian versions of the Mountain Troop's cap were used as well. A combination of Army and Luftwaffe cloth and metal cap insignia were utilized. Even NSDAP insignia consisting of the Party eagle and cockade were used from the Political Leader's visored dress caps and found on the "M-43" style and overseas caps. Volkssturm officers also used the "M-43" style caps as well as surplus Army officer's visored field (M-34 "crusher style") and dress caps. Pre-, E arly-, and Late-war styles of the Army and Luftwaffe overseas cap were found to be extensively used as well. It is also important to note that not all "M-43" style caps and other headdress necessarily have had to have insignia, for many Volkssturm members were photographed without any insignia!

Helmets utilized by the Volkssturm came in all shapes and sizes. The most common were the Wehrmacht steel helmets from the M35 to M42 series, however, those from the Great War were used as well, such as the M1916 and M1918 steel helmets. Helmets from the civilian and civil organizations were used as well. These ranged from the Luftschutz "Gladiator Style" to fire and police helmets. Early on in the War the Luftschutz (Air Raid Warning Service) began utilizing captured enemy helmets, the most common being the French "Adrian" style and the Soviet M1936 and M1940 helmets. By the latter part of 1944 these captured stocks of the Luftschutz were later transferred to the Volkssturm to compensate for the dwindling supply of Wehrmacht steel helmets Many helmets didn't bear any insignia except those previuosly used by another organization, such as the Luftschutz, fire/police, and Wehrmacht. Some Volkssturm formations had their unit designations painted directly onto their helmets. The shortages of war deemed that an enormous variety of headdress was worn by the Volkssturm. It can be literally said that anything was possible regarding what sort of uniform was worn.


Some Thoughts About Virtue Signaling on Uniforms

Back on June 19, I wrote a blog entry about how it looked like MLB was moving toward approving ad patches on uniforms for this season. (Thankfully, the winds soon shifted and uni ads were taken off the table, at least for now.) That entry prompted longtime reader Chris Weber to post the following comment:

I never thought I’d say this, but it’s getting to the point where I have really lost interest in all organized team sports. Between the pandemic shutdown … the virtue signaling, and the ownership greed, I realize my life is too short to warrant such concern.

Since the topic of the day was uni advertising, it’s presumably the “ownership greed” part of that critique that led Chris to post his comment. But for some reason — honestly, I’m not sure why — I was struck by his use of “virtue signaling” in that comment. And although Chris was talking about the sports world in general, not the uni-verse in particular, I’ve been thinking a lot about uniforms and virtue signaling over the past few months. Today I’ve decided that it’s finally time to write about it.

I should say at the outset that I really dislike the term virtue signaling, at least as it’s typically applied as a retort in political and cultural debates. First, it’s largely just a form of name-calling that seeks to delegitimize a viewpoint instead of actually engaging with or refuting that viewpoint. Second, it’s essentially an attempted form of mind-reading, since it asserts that the source of a particular viewpoint is insincere, which is something that’s usually impossible to know. Third, even if the mind-reading attempt happens to be accurate — in other words, even if the person espousing the viewpoint in question really is insincere — that’s not particularly relevant because, as I never tire of pointing out, the message is what matters, not the messenger. Just because someone is insincere doesn’t mean they’re wrong.

But what if we were to strip “virtue signaling” of its current cultural baggage and define it in a more straightforward and literal way — say, “communicating one’s belief in a virtuous cause or sentiment”? When viewed in that context, it’s hard to dispute that there’s been an unprecedented amount of virtue signaling going on in the uni-verse this summer. From activist appeals for racial justice to salutes to health care workers, uni-driven reminders that the sports world cares about the Real World — and is part of the Real World — have been everywhere. The NBA has had social justice messages in place of NOBs and on the court MLB has had Black Lives Matter sleeve patches and mound logos (although, for the most part, only for the first day or two of the season) the NFL has had racial justice messaging on helmet bumpers, end lines, officials’ caps, and more college football teams are wearing a wide variety of racial justice patches and helmet decals, and some players are using messages in place of their NOBs English soccer teams have used their uniforms to support racial justice and the National Health Service we’ll apparently be seeing social justice messaging in college basketball later this fall and on and on.

I’m using “virtue signaling” as a shorthand term here. You could just as easily call it civic engagement, or community outreach, or promoting worthy causes. But whatever you want to call it, we’re seeing an extraordinary amount of it this year. It’s become the new normal.

Here’s my question: Is that the kind of uni-verse we want? Or, like Chris Weber, do you find it to be a turn-off?

But wait — before you answer that question, keep in mind that virtue signaling has been part of the uni-verse for a long time now. Here are some pre-2020 examples — some very recent, others going back more than a century:

• Wearing camouflage uniforms (or military branch logo decals, or the names of fallen service members, or other things in that vein) for military appreciation is virtue signaling.

• Wearing stars/stripes-themed uniforms for various holidays is virtue signaling.

• Supporting a war effort by wearing red, white, and blue armbands or Hale America patches or American flag patches is virtue signaling.

• Having players who are war veterans wear the “ruptured duck” patch is virtue signaling.

• Wearing pink for breast cancer awareness (or wearing any other color or symbol for awareness of any other disease or disorder) is virtue signaling.

• Wearing rainbow-patterned uniforms or using rainbow-patterened equipment to support the LGBTQ community is virtue signaling.

• Wearing special uniforms for Black History Month is virtue signaling.

• Wearing patches or ribbons or decals to honor the victims of hurricanes, mass shootings, space shuttle disasters, highway collapses, bombings, wildfires, and other tragedies is virtue signaling.

• Wearing poppies for Remembrance Day is virtue signaling.

• Wearing a uniform with Braille lettering to support the blind, or sign language lettering to support the deaf, is virtue signaling.

• Certain “storytelling”-based alternate uniforms, such as the Memphis Grizzlies’ Martin Luther King Jr.-themed uni and the Oklahoma City Thunder’s uni honoring the victims of the 1995 OKC bombing, are virtue signaling.

(We could go further and say that having MLB players wear No. 42 for Jackie Robinson or No. 21 for Roberto Clemente is virtue signaling, and ditto for Negro Leagues throwback uniforms, but at least those worthy causes are sports-related. For now, let’s restrict our discussion of virtue signaling to messages regarding non-sports-related causes or events.)

That’s a pretty long list. I’m guessing most of you like some items on the list more than others. (Me too.) That’s because most of us have different ideas about what does or doesn’t constitute virtue, and different comfort levels with certain types of causes or sentiments being promoted on uniforms. But at their most basic level, all of the gestures on that list are saying the exact same thing: “This is a worthy cause, or at least a worthy sentiment. We support it, and so should you.”

Here’s a thought experiment: If forced to choose, would you prefer that all of the examples on that list take place — the ones you like and the ones you dislike — or none of them? In other words, would you prefer the world we have now, or would you prefer that the uni-verse, as the saying goes, stick to sports?

But wait — before you answer that question, here’s something to think about: When rock and roll was invented back in the 1950s, almost all of the songs were about girls, dating, cars, dancing, school, clothes, and so on. Then, in the early to mid-1960s, a bunch of new artists like Bob Dylan, the Beatles, and many others began to write about politics, racial equality, social justice, opposing the Vietnam War, and so on. You might say they were virtue signaling. Many fans of the earlier rock style, unhappy with the new lyrical content, complained that the artists should avoid social protest topics and “stick to music.”

Just as pop music began engaging with weightier subject matter as songwriters began wanting to express themselves more seriously, it seems to me that a lot of the virtue signaling we’re seeing in the uni-verse these days is about athletes wanting to express themselves. Not only are NBA and NFL players choosing the messages and names we see on their jerseys and helmet bumpers, but the availability of those messaging programs came about largely because the two leagues’ respective unions insisted upon it as a condition for playing during the pandemic. Similarly, the wildcat strike that took place across the sports world in late August was a form of players expressing themselves about the shooting of Jacob Blake by police in Kenosha, Wis.

I realize some people may not care too much about what an athlete thinks about non-sports topics (honestly, I don’t care that much myself). But for better or worse, that’s the reality we’ve built — all of us — by making athletes into celebrities. Those jillion-dollar salaries didn’t come out of nowhere — we help pay for them every time we attend a game, watch a game on TV, buy team merch, and so on. A player weighing in on things that take place outside the stadium isn’t all that different from a player choosing his walk-up music, or wearing a fancy outfit on his way to the arena because he knows he’ll be photographed as he arrives, or wearing a particular T-shirt to the postgame presser, or sending a message to his millions of Instagram followers. Personally, I don’t much care about any of that stuff, but that’s the sports world we now live in, and we all helped build that world by being sports fans.

So: Do we want athletes to express themselves? Or, as one observer has said, do we want them to shut up and dribble?

But wait — before you answer that, here’s something to think about: We usually applaud athletes when they express themselves by getting involved in their communities, whether by making appearances at the local hospital’s cancer ward, working with underprivileged kids, establishing their own charitable foundations, and so on (all of which could also be described as virtue signaling). Last month’s wildcat strike began because the Bucks and Brewers felt the need to make some sort of gesture regarding the southeastern Wisconsin community in which they play, and many of the other forms of virtue signaling we’re seeing this year are due to Black players feeling the need to speak up for the Black community.

Again, many people may feel more comfortable with some forms of community involvement than others, so it’s worth repeating that same thought experiment I proposed earlier: If forced to choose, would you prefer to live in a world with the full range of community involvement by athletes — the kind you like and the kind you don’t like — or none at all?

But wait — before you answer that, here’s something else I’ve been thinking about. While I realize this probably isn’t always the case 100% of the time, my experience is that the “stick to sports” people often explain their point of view by saying something like this: “I watch sports to escape the real world. I don’t want to be reminded of it.” But with all due respect to those of you who may have said or thought that, I don’t think it’s actually true. I think most of us are perfectly happy for the sports world to have real-world messaging as long as the message is one that we’re comfortable with or approve of. There is no sports-related reason, for example, for a team to showcase a “veteran of the game” or to play “God Bless America,” but many fans feel good about those forms of messaging because it reflects and reaffirms their values. Similarly, there is no sports-related reason for a team to have an LGBTQ Pride Night promotion, but many fans feel good about that form of messaging too, because it reflects and reaffirms their values. Both are examples of community outreach — and of virtue signaling.

So it’s once again worth asking: If forced to choose, would you prefer a sports world with a wide range of acknowledgments of what happens outside the stadium — the acknowledgments of things you like and of things you don’t — or none at all?

But wait — before you answer, let me take a crack at it myself, because I’ve been thinking about this virtue signaling stuff all summer, ever since Chris Weber posted that comment back on June 19. This essay roughly reflects the thought processes I’ve gone through while pondering the various sides of the issues. Here are a few conclusions I’ve come to:

• The difference between the sports world and the “real world” is largely a false distinction. Sports is part of the rest of the world, just like everything else. Sure, sports is escapist entertainment, but as I’ve been saying for many years, sports teams aren’t just business entities — they’re also civic entities, often cementing a common bond between generations and demographic groups. So it’s makes sense that they’d want to be engaged on matters of civic interest.

• This year, obviously, has been extraordinary in all sorts of ways, both for sports and for everything else. Given the various epic historical storylines that have intertwined in 2020, perhaps it’s not surprising that uniforms have featured an unprecedented amount virtue signaling this year. Whenever things get back to some semblance of normalcy, will the level of uni-driven virtue signaling return to pre-2020 levels? Or will this be one of those ratchet-like things, where the extent of the phenomenon goes in only one direction? Tough to say. (Update: Reader/commenter Tim Dunn notes that NBA commish Adam Silver recently said that the league’s jersey and court messaging will likely be return to pre-2020 levels next season.)

• Until about five or 10 years ago, uni-driven virtue signaling tended to reinforce mainstream, establishment institutions: the military, first responders, major holidays, and so on. These institutions may be worthy of support, but they are not the only things worthy of support. Moreover, these institutions have not always been fair to, or their benefits shared equally by, certain segments of our society. The more recent shift toward uniforms recognizing things like LGBTQ rights, racial justice, and even Earth Day seems like a long-overdue corrective. (ESPN’s Howard Bryant just wrote a new piece last week that touches upon that theme.) And as I wrote back in late March, the pandemic may help redefine our conception of heroes, which in turn may redefine which types of heroes are saluted on uniforms.

• That said, I have to say that I’ve found this year’s uni-driven virtue signaling to be a bit much. Maybe it’s because 2020 has been so exhausting on so many fronts. Or maybe it’s just that the sheer volume of messages has watered down the effect — when every game or uniform has a “special” message, the result is that none of it feels special, at least to me.

So after all of that pondering, I’ll ask myself the same question I asked all of you: If forced to choose, would I want a uni-verse with the full range of virtue signaling, or none at all?

I’ve gone back and forth on this. The way I’m feeling today, I’d probably say none at all. It’s not so much that I want the sports world to stick to sports it’s more that I’d like the uni-verse to stick to uniforms. (Clemson football coach Dabo Swinney recently said something similar.)

But I also realize that’s probably easy for me to say (and also for Swinney to say) because I’m a straight, white, middle-class male, so wanting the uni-verse to stick to uniforms is something of a luxury for me — a luxury that not everyone shares. If I were Black, gay, poor, or female (or any combination thereof), I might feel very differently about having my identity and my interests being championed on a high-profile sports uniform. Maybe it would mean a lot to me.

As if to underscore that point, just as I was working on this section of this essay, readers Pedro N. and Chris Weber — the same Chris Weber whose months-old comment prompted this essay to begin with — had an interesting back-and-forth in the comments section of a recent Uni Watch post. The topic was the cap-inscription tribute to Dominican baseball pioneer Ozzie Virgil by the Twins’ four Dominican players. Here’s a slightly edited/streamlined version of the exchange they had:

Chris Weber: I imagine the MLB players from Venezuela, Mexico, etc. will have similar tributes in short order. Who’s to object? The precedent has been set. Educational opportunity for all fans, I guess.

Pedro N.: Would you object to Mexican or Venezuelan players having similar tributes? If so, please explain why? Or am I misinterpreting your comment?

Chris: Misinterpreted. … I’m concerned there is a point where tributes for ethnicities in sports can become diluted. For example, do we have MLB players all wear tributes for the Canadian contingent? Or the Australian? Or Curaçao? Do the sheer numbers matter? Should they? At some point, it loses its impact, wouldn’t you agree? But again, at least there’s the educational opportunity for fans to learn about the various pathfinders, regardless of their impact. How impactful each should be to matter is up for debate.

Pedro: I do agree with you to some extent [that] all tributes in sports may be reaching a point of becoming diluted (including tributes to ethnicities). But a key thing to remember is that this isn’t MLB force-feeding us more “tributes” it’s a small group of players who took it upon themselves to honor someone they care about. From what I can tell, they didn’t even make too big of a deal about it.

[Also], at least to my knowledge, Australians and Canadians haven’t faced too much injustice in the U.S. because of where they’re from. … That point matters to me — … [the Tigers] didn’t even acknowledge that [Virgil] was Dominican [instead referring to him as Black]. For us minorities, having people learn about us and our history is important to us.

Another way to think about this is that uni-driven virtue signaling is similar to public monuments and street names — it’s part of the collective story we tell about ourselves as a society. A lot of our feelings about those stories depends on who gets to decide which stories get told, and by whom.

One thing’s for certain: There’s no shortage of worthy causes out there. Even in baseball — the major sport with the most games per season — it would be easy for a team, if it were so inclined, to use its uniforms to virtue-signal for a different worthy cause or sentiment for every single game of the year. Obviously, we haven’t reached that point yet, but it’s certainly possible.

So I’ll ask again: Is that the kind of uni-verse we want? I’m still wrestling with my own answer you can go ahead and give yours now. (And thanks for listening through this lengthy piece!)

Infield flies: By now you probably know that a fly made a prominent and prolonged appearance on Mike Pence’s head during last night’s vice presidential debate. What you might not know is that this insect occupation took place 13 years — almost to the day — after another notable event involving uninvited arthropods: the famous 2007 ALDS midge invasion.

Coincidence? Tough to say! But it’s worth noting that bug infestations occurring on 13-year cycles are not unheard of in the wild. I don’t know about you, but I’m circling Oct. 9, 2033 on my calendar.

ITEM! Uni Watch magnets: I got a good deal on two small batches of Uni Watch Magnets! Perfect for sticking on your fridge, your car, your file cabinet, your locker, or wherever.

Both designs measure 3″ at their widest points. They’re thin and flexible, so they’ll conform to curved surfaces as well as flat ones.

I have 50 of the round ones and 30 of the stirrup-shaped ones. Update: The stirrup-shaped ones are now SOLD OUT. I may be able to get more at some point down the road. If you’d like to be notified when that happens, let me know.

I still have some of the round ones. Want one? Here’s the deal:

1. Price: $3 plus $1 for shipping. Limit one per person.

2. Send me the proper amount via Venmo (use @Paul-Lukas-2 as the payee), Zelle ([email protected]), or Google Pay ([email protected]). If you’d rather use Apple Pay or a paper check, contact me and I’ll give you the info you need. Sorry, no PayPal.

3. After sending payment, email me with your mailing address.

4. If you’re outside of the USA, contact me so I can calculate the shipping charge and arrange an alternate form of payment for you.

5. If you want to combine your purchase with an order for a Uni Watch key ring, a trading card, a seam ripper, or a chain-stitched patch, please email me and I’ll give you a price that includes a combined shipping fee for the whole shebang. (Sorry, these are the only Uni Watch items I can combine into one shipment, because our other items ship from separate locations, not from Uni Watch HQ.)

Happy National Pierogi Day! If you have somehow come into ownership of the shirt shown above, today is definitely the day to wear it (and also a good day to cook up some tasty pierogi!).

Of course, I can’t fathom how you or anyone else would have acquired such a shirt. If you’d like to discuss that lamentable state of affairs, shoot me a note and we can talk about it.

The Ticker
By Alex Hider

Baseball News : Rays P Tyler Glasnow was wearing a belt with a palm tree on Tuesday night (from Kenneth Guckenberger). … Phillies RF Bryce Harper has been wearing the jersey of teammate J.T. Realmuto in an attempt to get Philadelphia’s front office to re-sign the catcher (from Mike Chamernik). … The Class-A Fredericksburg Nationals have unveiled a “history wall” in their stadium (from Kary Klismet). … An exhibit focused on baseball jerseys will be coming to the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts (from Andy Greenlaw). … Edwin Bonner notes that when the Yankees and Royals met in the famous 1990 Deion Sanders/Bo Jackson matchup, a Royals trainer was wearing powder blue pants to match Kansas City’s road uniforms, but was also wearing a royal blue BP jersey. … A small baseball park in Litchfield, Minn., has installed a row of seats from the old Minneapolis Metrodome (from @Natron44).

Football News : Syracuse will be wearing white helmets, orange jerseys and white pants when they host Duke on Saturday (from Jakob Fox). … Iowa state is going white-red-white this weekend (from Chad Lehman). … Maryland will be installing a larger video board in its stadium (from West Brown). … UNLV has added a white helmet to its rotation (from Mark Wallington). … Gardner-Webb is still working on scheduling a football season, but they’ve gone ahead and released photos of a new uni set (from Timmy Donahue). … Oregon made a custom football jersey for Portland Trail Blazers star Damian Lillard (from Paul Panganiban). … Reader Jon Dies was browsing online for vintage Ohio University apparel and found a 1994 jersey with a patch commemorating 100 years of Bobcats football. … Atoka High School (Oklahoma) has added a memorial decal for a local highway patrolman who died of Covid-19 (from Paul Deaver).

Hockey News : The Senators got Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek to help introduce their third overall pick on Tuesday (from Marshall Doig). … HC Traktor Chelyabinsk of the KHL wore one-off jerseys honoring World Cerebral Palsy Day yesterday (from Sy Hart). … New uniforms for the Macon Mayhem of the Southern Professional Hockey League (from @BringBackErk54).

Basketball News : According to the initial uniform scripting, the Lakers planned to wear their Kobe Bryant “Mamba” unis twice during the Finals — for Game Two and a potential Game Seven — but they’ve called an audible and will wear the black uniforms on Friday in Game Five as they try to clinch a championship (thanks to all who shared). … NBA reporter Mark Murphy says he was staying at a cabin in New Hampshire over the weekend located near where Celtics Hall of Famer Bob Cousy used to hold basketball camps. While there, he found an old Cousy-themed board game (from @HitTheGlass). … The NBA, which originally said its next season would start around Dec. 1 and then more recently said Christmas Day at the earliest, is now saying late January or February. That article also says the traditional fall-to-summer schedule may never be brought back, with a winter start date likely becoming the new normal.

Soccer News : The Athletic (hard paywall) has a deep dive on the new crest of 2022 USL Championship expansion club Queensboro FC after viewing the team’s 110-page (!) crest explainer document (from David Raglin). … A couple of Manchester United notes from our own Anthony Emerson: The club signed RW Facundo Pellistri, who will wear No. 28. The team tweeted a GIF that shows how Pellistri will look in the team’s 2020-21 kits. The club also signed LB Alex Telles, who will go FNOB. … The Swedish women’s team Rosengård will wear pink uniforms in October for breast cancer awareness (from our own Jamie Rathjen). … Also from Jamie: New jerseys, which are made from sustainable materials, for the New Zealand. … Côte d’Ivoire has opened its new national soccer stadium (from Kary Klismet). … Back in May, Puma ran a Manchester City shirt design contest. Now the winning design has been revealed, although it won’t be worn on the pitch (from Trevor Williams).

Grab Bag : The pandemic plus some internal scandals are threatening Nike’s primacy in the running industry (WaPo link) (from Tom Turner). … Pharmacy chain Rite Aid has a new logo (from John Cerone). … New uniforms for German volleyball club Berlin Recycling Volleys (from Jeremy Brahm). … A few notes from Timmy Donahue: Elmhurst Ballet School students in Edgbaston, Birmingham, are wearing new uniforms made of sustainable fabrics from ocean waste and abandoned fishing nets, and a blog has revealed the “secret meanings” behind New York’s subway signs. … Justice Rosalie Abella of the Canadian Supreme Court was wearing a sequined mask during court on Tuesday (from Mike Styczen). .. .New jerseys for France’s national rugby union teams.

127 comments to Some Thoughts About Virtue Signaling on Uniforms

Great points, especially with the juxtaposition to other forms of entertainment like rock n roll. I kind of feel like the people who need to read this (ie the people turned off by the BLM / equality messages on NBA uniforms and the court) will not read all the way through or at least read enough to even try to understand why such messages are even necessary.

If I lived in the US, I’d be a minority. I have relatives who migrated there, and I try to put myself in their shoes. I can kind of see why it’s important enough to support a cause that it supplants the place of my own identity in something as visible as a jersey.

At the very least, it gets the conversation started instead of important issues getting shoved to the side because people turn to sports as a distraction. Hopefully it gets the right people to think long and hard about the reality of the situation.

Good questions and points made today Paul. I’m in the camp of let’s tone it down on the “virtue signaling” for a bit. I hate to say it, but it’s almost refreshing to see a uniform in it’s “raw state” i.e. no special messaging, patches, NOB, throwback, fauxback, special day of the week/month, etc. I agree that social issues and causes are important, but where is the line drawn on plastering uniforms with messaging? In my opinion, it just becomes noise and the importance of the message is lost amongst all the others.

This is where I also fall. Sports uniforms have strayed from their original purpose, to visually separate 2 competing teams. If I had the choice of none of the one-offs for any reason or all of them, I would go back to basics.
Great piece, Paul.

Virtue signaling on the uniforms themselves. If I had to choose between “everything on that long list, including the ruptured duck” and “none of those at all,” pretty easy. None of those at all. I would be very happy if Management could be limited to just adding a memorial patch when necessary. No American flag just because it’s 9/11, no Pinktober, just no thanks. If a player wants to rep a charity (I’m looking at Craig Biggio’s Best Buddies cap pin), put out a commercial on Instagram or television, subject to union rules and the CBA.
But that’s just a uniform preference. Let the players roam the pediatric ward, help out the soup kitchen, pick up a megaphone while exercising a First Amendment right, etc. Coincidentally, I just read The Open Man by Dave DeBusschere. I’m 31 years old, and I was amazed that Cazzie Russell was a national guardsman during the 1970 basketball season. Athletes today are so rich and specialized, they would never join the army! (Well, Pat Tillman sure did.) What I mean to say is, civic engagement is fundamental to society, and I say that for everybody. That should be applauded and fostered. But I’d rather the uniforms stay timeless…tagged by “Set 2, 2020” on a laundry tag on the inside instead of god knows what kind of patch or special color on the outside.
I realize there is so much toothpaste out of the tube now, but you asked what I’d rather, if I had a magic wand or something.

I was going to say all of this, so thanks for beating me to it (and putting it more eloquently).

In the late 󈨀s, it wasn’t uncommon for athletes to avoid the military draft by getting themselves placed in National Guard units. IIRC, they were required to be with their units for one weekend a month and one two-week callup per year, but the alternative was being sent to Vietnam.

Before that, the military had its own protections for atheletes, which is why we see so many photos of 󈧬s pro ballplayers on service teams. It was well understood that a famous pro wouldn’t get shot at unless he really wanted to. They were more valuable to the military on propaganda and morale tours, like the actors.

Great points today, Paul, and a topic that I think does need to be discussed.

For a few years now, I’ve had a similar discussion with myself and a few others when it comes to the “special occasion uniforms.” As you mentioned, we’ve seen a number of teams wear camo, USA flag, pink, etc. details on their uniforms, or the uniform as a whole. While it’s easy to see the base-line intend of the design – to honor the soldiers, for one – I often think about it one level further.

Why are you doing this? What is your reason?

The first team that wore USA flag helmet decals probably did so out of a genuine respect for what the flag means, those who fought for it, etc. and wanted to pay tribute to that. Then it quickly became a copycat situation. So many teams are now wearing USA flag helmet decals, but is it for that genuine respect and want to honor a group, or because the last person did it?

My line for this has often been, “At what point does a good gesture no longer be a good gesture?”

We can all agree that cancer patients need support and research money. But is Oregon wearing an all pink uniform *solely* for those reasons, or as a “look-at-me” attention grab that just so happens to support cancer research with the fundraising of auctioning off the uniforms?

Personally, I’ve felt that many teams have jumped on this bandwagon of special occasion uniforms only because they don’t want to be left out. South Carolina has worn Wounded Warrior camo uniforms in the past. They “clearly care for the soldiers!” But Auburn hasn’t worn an alternate uniform for these causes. Does Auburn not care about the soldiers? Auburn doesn’t wear a USA flag helmet decal in the shape of the AU logo. Does Auburn hate America? No, absolutely not. But that’s almost how it feels some of these discussions tend to go with this topic at times.

Regarding the USA flag helmet decals, it’s always been a little humorous to me that teams are literally cutting the flag into the shape of their own logo. The flag is a rectangular shape with a specific design, not in the shape of Houston’s interlocking UH logo. If the flag touching the ground or being burned is such a bad, taboo thing for many people, then why isn’t cutting the flag into a team logo? (Don’t know if that makes sense. I hope it makes sense.)

You wrote that “the message is what matters, not the messenger” today, and that honestly stopped me in my tracks and made me rethink this approach I’ve had the last few years. That speaks directly against my “good gesture isn’t a good gesture” line. And I appreciate that challenge. I’ll have to think about that for a few days.

Hey Clint, I’m not Paul, but I would ask out loud, what if your “At what point is a good gesture no longer a good gesture” and Paul’s “The message is what matters, not the messenger” are versions of the same message? Or at least more consistent with each other than you think? (Instead of the latter being against your belief in the former.)

Team A has a “matriarch” for a lack of a better term. She dies suddenly due to breast cancer that was completely undiagnosed. The team is heartbroken. Pink wristbands for everybody, bought on a whim, and her initials scribbled on them with a black Sharpie. Good gesture I think, and the message is “she’s dead and we’re sad.”

Totally hypothetical “University of Smoregon” (normally green and gold, with occasional inexplicable black, chrome, and/or anthracite gray) wears a pink helmet in October Week 1, a pink jersey in October Week 2, pink pants in October Week 3, and all of the above in October Week 4. I’d say the gesture turns bad if you think “Smoregon’s message is ‘Never the same look twice,’ that’s a bad message, and I don’t like breast cancer awareness as a cheap excuse for new looks.” So the message matters, and the gesture is not good.

Maybe the middle point is when the league tells everybody to put the pink helmet sticker on the back, slaps a pink logo on the game football, and swaps out all the coaches’ caps with pink-laden versions. Is a broad management directive a good gesture? Would you change your answer if Susan G. Komen literally bought their in-game commercial from the league? Then would you take the league (messenger) at their word for what the message is, or would you have your own interpretation of the message?

NASCAR has been the home of some unintentional, unwarranted, conspiratorial virtue signaling over the years.

For years, Jeff Gordon drove a car sponsored by DuPont, and as a way to show off their colorful history in automotive paint, his car had various multi-hued designs. His team was even referred to as “The Rainbow Warriors.” So of course, some fans decided he must be gay, and all kinds of nonsense (mostly negative) ballooned from there. Ugh.

Another example: years later, when Dale Earnhardt Jr. was changing teams, he had to leave his popular number 8 behind. He chose 88 as his new number. Great, let’s get back in the car and on the track. Except… the number 88 has been co-opted by white supremacist groups as a super-secret substitution for “HH” (H is the 8th letter of the alphabet), with “HH’ in turn being shorthand for “Heil Hitler.” So, of course, some folks had to toss that conspiratorial nonsense around (in this case, some of it supporting the idea). Pretty much anyone in the sport would say Junior is a decent guy, and the number has no significance beyond being his old number twice. Ugh again.

“All or Nothing at All” seems to be a false dichotomy to me. Like much in the modern world, moderation is becoming a lost idea.

That said, it doesn’t bother me too much the fact that the current flurry is less “corporate” feeling – i.e., feeling like it’s a promotion by someone – is a plus in my book. Examples: the revelation that the military paid for military-related NFL promotions, the fact that a certain charity sues other charities in order to “own” a particular cause and also happens to sponsor this cause in pro sports, etc.

“All or Nothing at All” seems to be a false dichotomy to me. Like much in the modern world, moderation is becoming a lost idea.

Except this is a thought experiment, designed to inspire reflection and conversation.

Yeah, except by making it “all” rather than “some”, it makes “none” the only reasonable choice.

I agree that the amount of organic impetus behind it impacts my feelings quite a bit.

While “GI Joke” makes me a little uncomformtable from a semantic aspect, I hate the corporate astroturf forces behind it with the passion of 1000 suns.

If you want to appreciate the military, vote for higher VA benefits, giveaway free tickets, draw attention to the actual plight of military families not sell merch and donate .001%.

I just want to say that this was outstanding writing on a complex subject – layering nuance upon nuance, objective observation on a subjective matter. Superb stuff.


The Royal Teens singing &aposShort Shorts&apos (1957)

Bike shorts with or without bike

Raquel Welch in hot pants (1967)

Three of the guys didn&apost get the email about wearing high socks with their lederhosen.

Young men wearing cargo shorts

I went to buy camouflage shorts and couldn&apost find any!

Long bike shorts of spandex or nylon

Are created to be super skin tight.

They are supposed to relieve chafing

But with that fit, chafing they might incite.

For myself, I think I would choose

Bike shorts that are a little more loose.

Hot pants are also known as &aposshort shorts&apos

With inseam length of two inches or less.

Mary Quant designed them in the �s,

And launched them in London to great success.

Lederhosen are well-known German shorts

Worn with high socks in any weather.

What are they made of you might ask?

I thought you knew. They’re made of leather.

Cargo shorts have more than 4 pockets

Stitched to the outside with turn-down flaps.

With all that extra room to stow your stuff,

You can carry your baseball caps,

several maps, assorted traps,

Designer flood pants by John Galliano

British schoolboys in uniform

Long shorts that look much like short trousers,

Are sometimes also called Flood pants.

They may be called ‘shankles’ (shorts plus ankles)

Or known as shorts plus pants – that’s ‘shants.’

School shorts are tailored and sometimes flannel,

Worn in the country with the English Channel.

Gym shorts are usually worn for gym

By she or he or her or him.

The long and the short of it

Convertible shorts! A great invention.

They are long pants that zip off at the knee.

When you find you need more formal attire

Just zip the bottom back on – one, two, three.

Culottes for girls are a divided skirt,

Loose-cut shorts is what they resemble.

Skorts are shorts with fabric in the front.

It looks like a skirt. Not coincidental.

But most of all for sports.

Something you ought to know .

I call it a word to the wise:

Don&apost wear shorts if you look like these guys!

The word, shorts , also refers to short films so this hub is dedicated to my favorite short film hero, Mickey Mouse. Who also happens to wear bright red shorts!


Supe 50: A Uniform History of the Broncos and Panthers

Today is the BIG day, and momentarily I’ll be joined by Gridiron Uniform Database founder and historian Tim Brulia , who will bring you the ultimate uniform history of the two combatants in today’s Super Bowl: The Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers.

We know what the teams will be wearing: Denver, even though they are the designated “home” team, have chosen to wear their white jerseys and pants atop their navy blue helmet, and Carolina will go with black jerseys and silver pants to be paired with their silver helmets.

Today’s game will mark only the fifth time these two teams have ever met on the field — and never before in the post-season. There have been a total of three different uniform combinations worn, and Denver has defeated the Panthers three of the four times they’ve met.

The first game took place on November 9, 1997, in Denver, with Denver wearing blue over white and the Panthers in white/white. Denver was victorious 34-0. It was a rainy day at Mile High and the Broncos were on top of the world, on their way to becoming Super Bowl champs following the 1997 season. Here’s how that game looked (click any image below to enlarge):

The two teams would meet again, on October 10, 2004, also in Mile High. This game would also result in a Denver victory, 20-17. The Broncos would again go blue/white with Carolina in white/white:

The third time the teams would meet would be on a different field, in different uniforms, and with a different end result. The Panthers would defeat the Broncos on December 14, 2008, for the only time in their history, 30-10, wearing black jerseys and silver pants. The Broncos would be in white over white:

The fourth, and final time, the two teams would meet was also in Carolina — a loss for the Panthers by a score of 36-14 — on November 11, 2012. This time, the Panthers would break out a new pair of black pants to wear with their black jerseys, while the Broncos were again in white over white:

The “storyline” of the Broncos wearing orange jerseys (and losing, always) in the Super Bowl has been beaten to death over the past two weeks, and isn’t worth reiterating here. But shortly after they advanced to the big dance, the Broncos did (moderately) shock the world by announcing they would take the very unusual step of wearing white jerseys, despite being the designated “home” team. This, of course, lent credence to the theory that the orange jerseys themselves were “unlucky,” causing the team to lose in the Supe. I completely discount this theory, as it’s not the jersey that is unlucky — rather, the Broncos lost to superior teams, or were only slight favorites prior to those losses.

To wit: in their four Super Bowl losses wearing orange…

Super Bowl XII — Played the Dallas Cowboys. The Broncos were a 6 point underdog. The would lose the game 27-10.

Super Bowl XXII — Played the Washington football team. The Broncos were a 3 point favorite. They’d lose that game 42-10.

Super Bowl XXIV — Played the San Francisco 49ers. The Broncos were a 12 point underdog. They lost 55-10.

Super Bowl XLVIII — Played the Seattle Seahawks. The Broncos were a 2.5 point favorite. They were defeated 43-8.

So, in their four losses, the Broncos were big underdogs in two of them, so the losses (even though lopsided) weren’t entirely unexpected. In the two games in which they were slight favorites, they were defeated soundly. No matter what the spreads, anyone taking Denver in those games would have lost in Vegas. Are the orange jerseys, therefore, unlucky? Only if you were placing money on them. But they were favored (slightly) in only two of those games.

What about the Broncos in other jerseys?

Super Bowl XXI — Played the New York Giants. The Broncos were a 9.5 point underdog, and lost 39-20. Again, not favored (and hence, expected to lose), but also, losing even against the spread. They wore white jerseys and white pants for this game.

Super Bowl XXXII — Played the Green Bay Packers. The Broncos were an 11.5 point underdog, but won the game (wearing blue over white), 31-24. This was their first Super Bowl victory and the first time they’d ever beaten the spread.

Super Bowl XXXIII — Played the Atlanta Falcons. The Broncos were a 7.5 point favorite. They won their second Supe by a score of 34-19, beating the spread, and wearing white over white, as they will today.

So are the orange jerseys unlucky? Maybe — an 0-4 record in them doesn’t help — but in all five of their losses (three of which had them as big underdogs), they couldn’t even cover the spread. In their two wins, they covered. Maybe it’s not the jerseys that are unlucky, but the team itself just played poorly (or were outplayed) in their losses, regardless of what they wore. Today, the Panthers are 6 point favorites — history would suggest that if the Broncos do lose, they’ll lose by at least a touchdown (and probably more). If they beat the spread, they’ll probably win the game outright. If I were a betting man, I would NOT expect a close game. The only time the Broncos have been underdogs of 6 or more points and beat the spread (and won the game) was their upset over the Packers. It was their only win wearing a blue jersey. Maybe THAT is the lucky one, rather than the orange jersey being “unlucky.”

The Broncos only loss to the Panthers came while they were wearing white jerseys and pants while the Panthers wore black jerseys over silver pants. The teams will be wearing those same uniform combos today. Carolina was a 7 point favorite then. Ladies and gentlemen, place your bets.

And next up: Timmy B with the uni histories of the Broncos and Panthers.

Denver Broncos Uniform History

I’m pleased now to present GUD historian Tim Brulia , who brings us the annual uniform histories of the Super Bowl entrants. He’ll start with Denver and finish with Carolina. Here’s Tim:

Denver Broncos Uniform History
By Tim Brulia

1960: As one of the eight charter members of the American Football League, the Broncos take the field in brown, yellow and white colors. The helmets are brown with a white stripe and the players jersey numbers in rounded white on the sides. The away jerseys are rather generic, white with brown block front, back and sleeve (TV) numbers. The home jerseys are identical except that they are yellow in color. There are NO names on the backs of the jerseys. The pants are brown with two thin yellow stripes on the sides. The socks you ask. Yeah, the socks are those immortal vertically striped socks, brown and white when worn with the white jerseys and brown and yellow when worn with the yellow tops.

1961: Players names in brown are added to the backs of both sets of jerseys. TV numbers are removed from the yellow jerseys.

1962: The Broncos torch (literally) their 60-61 uglies before the start of the season. In their place is a whole new identity. The helmets go from brown to orange with a white stripe and a very strange looking blue horse on the sides. Jerseys also undergo a thorough re-brand. Away jerseys are white with blue numbers on the front, back and sleeves, with three blue stripes under the TV numbers. Home jerseys go from brown to orange with white numbers on the torso and the sleeves, with three white stripes under the TV numbers. Pants are a more conventional white with thin blue/orange/blue stripes on the sides. Socks are a solid orange. Before we go, the goofy blue horse on the helmets apparently are too hard to see, so the Broncos change the color of the horse from blue to white, effective with an October 14th game at Oakland.

Side Note: It looks like the Broncos began the preseason with some new helmets but old unis. More on that in this article — PH

1965: While the helmet and pants basically stays the same, the rest of the uniform undergoes some change. The road jersey has blue trim on the crew neck collar, with a thin orange outline on the blue front and back numbers. NOBs are straight blue. The sleeve trim undergoes major change, with the TV numbers in white with thin blue outline in an orange area that is flanked by a blue stripe above and below the orange portion. The orange jersey sports a white crew collar, with white front and back numbers with thin blue outline and straight white NOBs. The sleeves have TV numbers in white inside a blue area with a white stripe above and below the blue area. The socks change from orange to blue. The orange also appears to have a more reddish glow about them.

1966: Everything stays the same, except the helmet undergoes some tweaking. Rather than a plain white stripe, the helmet now features a rather thin white/blue/white combo and the silly horse is now thinly outlined in blue. If you look closely, the horse’s eye is a star!

1967: Apart from the socks, the uniforms undergo some notable changes. The helmet changes from orange to blue, with a white stripe flanked by very thin orange stripes, and the horse is removed and replaced by…nothing. The helmet is sans logo. The white jersey now has block style numbers with orange trim on the torso and sleeves. NOBs are blue. Sleeve stripes are separated in a medium blue/thin orange/medium blue style. For the orange jerseys, the numbers are block white with blue trim on the front, back and sleeves. NOBs are white. Sleeve stripes are separated with a medium blue/thin white/medium blue pattern. The pant stripes are reversed to an orange/blue/orange combo.

1968: All remains the same, except for the helmet and an addition. After a one year logo exile, an orange serifed D with a white outline added around the outer edge of the D. Inside the D is the front end of a white horse with a snort of steam that overlaps the D. The stripes also change to a thicker white/orange/white combination. The addition is a set of orange pants that is worn with the white jersey. The orange pants have a blue/white/blue stripe pattern.

Side Note: The GUD has a nice article on the Broncos “D” Logo Variance AND 1967 & 1968 Denver Broncos. — PH

1973: Stripes are added to the socks. They are Northwestern in style with the outer stripes in white and the inner stripe in orange.

1975: The facemasks go from gray to white. The blue socks are changed to white socks, with the stripe motif matching that of the white jersey sleeves. For the Broncos last home game, the Colorado Statehood Centennial patch is worn on the left shoulder of the orange jersey. White cleats are worn exclusively (save for the kickers).

1976: The Broncos play musical socks, with yet another change, going back to blue socks, with three orange stripes, flanked with white feather striping.

1978: A “sorta” retro look as the orange pants return to be worn again with the white jerseys, and the solid blue socks make an encore appearance as well.

1980: The orange pants are dropped, this time for good. The socks change from solid blue to orange, mimicking the sleeve stripes on the orange jerseys.

1983: For the first game of the season, the Broncos wear a memorial patch for Assistant Coach Rich McCabe.

1984: Like the other seven charter AFL teams, the Broncos wear a 25th Season patch, located on the left collarbone area of the jersey.

1989: The sleeve stripes change a bit. The stripes are no longer separated. On the white jerseys, the stripes are thin blue/medium orange/thin blue while the orange jerseys striping is now thin blue/medium white/thin blue. Oddly enough the striping on the orange socks is unchanged.

1994: The NFL 75th season patch is worn on the left collarbone area of both jerseys. The sleeve stripes on both jerseys shrink in size. The NOB’s are outlined to match the number outlines on both sets of jerseys. Like virtually all other NFL teams, the Broncos wear throwbacks to commemorate the NFL’s 75th Season. The Broncos wear 1965 vintage uniforms, with the helmet the exact same as worn from 1962-1965. The jerseys are similar to the 1965-1966 style, with slight differences and feature the NFL/75 patch. The pants are the current (for 1994) style and the socks are solid blue. Each throwback (white and orange) is worn once.

Side Note: Nice photos and history on the 1994 throwbacks on the GUD. — PH

1997: The uniform is overhauled. Helmet: Now navy blue (with navy mask), with the logo now a forward facing white head of a horse with an orange mane. Striping is now three orange stripes starting in the back with the outer two stripes ending at a point before the inner stripe, which itself ends at a point before the front edge of the shell. Jerseys: A) white with navy collar, navy special font numbers on front, black and shoulders trimmed in orange, with straight navy NOB. Broncos wordmark in navy just above front numbers. Navy side panels with a thin front orange outline that curl around front of armpit and comes to a point flanking the collar. Pants worn with this jersey are white with striping that matches side panels and curls slightly to the front coming to a point just above pant edge. B) navy with orange collar, white special font numbers on front, back and shoulders trimmed in orange, with straight white NOB. Broncos wordmark in white just above front numbers. Orange side panels that curl around front of armpit and comes to a point flanking the collar. Pants worn with this jersey are white with orange striping that matches side panels on the navy jersey and curls slightly to the front coming to a point just above pant edge. There’s also a navy set of pants introduced with the unveiling, but it is not worn during the regular or post season. Socks: solid navy with a thin orange stripe separating the navy from the white sanitary socks. When the Broncos appear (victorious) in Super Bowl XXXII, they wear the logo patch on the left collarbone area of the navy jersey.

1998: The Broncos wear the Super Bowl XXXIII logo patch on the white jersey for the Big Game, again in winning fashion.

2001: For Thanksgiving Day in Dallas, the Broncos wear a throwback of 1980-1988 vintage, with the TV numbers notably placed on the shoulders as opposed to the sleeves.

2002: The Broncos add an orange alternate to the mix, with a navy collar, white special font numbers on front, back and shoulders trimmed in navy, with white NOB trimmed in navy. Broncos wordmark in white just above front numbers. Navy side panels that curl around front of armpit and comes to a point flanking the collar. Pants worn with white jersey are worn with the orange jersey.

2003: The navy pants that were introduced with the other parts of the 1997 changeover, finally make their regular season debut, while the orange alternates stay in the closet.

2005: The Broncos stick to the basics for 2005 as only the white/whites and the navy/whites see game action.

2006: The all navy look returns to action for a few games.

2008: While the all navys are shelved, the orange jerseys make a comeback after a three year absence. The Gene Upshaw memorial patch is worn for Week 1.

2009: The Broncos commemorate their 50th Season with a special patch worn on the left collarbone area of all three (white, navy and orange) jerseys. All four combos were worn. As part of the AFL Legacy tribute, for a couple of games the Broncos wore the uniforms that were supposedly never to be worn again, the infamous brown and gold unis from 1960 and 1961. These jerseys featured the AFL inspired 50th anniversary season logo patch on the left collarbone area of both the white and yellow jerseys. One note of interest is that the vertically striped socks were worn without white sanitary socks and some players decided to style up the verticals by twisting the stripes around, creating a bit of a candy-cane effect to the stripes. So all in all, there were six different uni combos worn this season.

2010: Again the four combos were worn this season, plus the rather bland “International Series” patch was worn for their 10/31 game in London against the 49ers.

2012: For the first time since the 1997 redesign, orange jerseys become the primary home jersey as the navy jersey is relegated to an alternate status and is worn only once with the navy pants. For two weeks late in the season, the Broncos wear a commemorative patch for the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s 50th anniversary only on the white jersey.

2013: Collar goes from blue/orange to solid blue on orange jerseys, and white/blue to solid blue on white tops. Collar goes solid orange on blue jerseys. Wearing the orange jersey for Super Bowl XLVIII (48), the Broncos add the SB logo patch to the left collarbone area.

2014: The navy alternate is worn with the navy pants for a game (Week 7 on a Sunday night hosting the San Francisco 49ers).

2015: The navy alternate is worn twice, once with the white pants with orange stripes (at home in Week 7 on a Sunday night hosting the Green Bay Packers as an ode to Super Bowl XXXII) and once with the navy pants (Week 14 hosting the Oakland Raiders). In a bit of a surprise, the Broncos announce the wearing of the white jersey as the “home” team for Super Bowl 50, eschewing the normal orange tops for the game.

Thanks, Tim. Before we move on to the Carolina Panthers, here’s a neat timeline/.gif showing the Broncos uni evolution.

Carolina Panthers Uniform History

Of course, the Panthers not only have a shorter uniform history due to many less years (25 or so) in the league, but they’re one of those rare teams that hasn’t really messed with their original set too much over the years. Once again, TB is back with the definitive uniform history

Carolina Panthers
By Tim Brulia

1995: The Carolina Panthers enter the National Football League as one of two expansion franchises (the Jacksonville Jaguars are the other new team) bringing the number of teams to 30. The Panthers introduce a silver helmet with the head of a snarling black panther on the sides, trimmed in light blue and outlined in white. The helmet has two black stripes outlined in light blue starting in the front of the helmet that flair slightly outward then come to a point about 2/3’s of the back of the helmet. A black facemask completes the headgear. The white jersey consists of a black collar and black block torso numbers outlined in light blue. The name on back (NOB) is black outlined in light blue as well. TV numbers in the same fashion as the front and back numbers adorn the shoulders. Shoulder stripes with a black/light blue/black pattern immediately follow, with the helmet logo placed on the sleeves. The black jersey follows a similar pattern as the white jersey with a light blue collar. The numbers (front, back and TV) are white and outlined in light blue. The NOB is white outlined in light blue also. The sleeve logo, same as on the white jersey but outlined in white. The shoulder stripe combo is silver/light blue/silver. The Panthers sport an Inaugural Season patch on both jerseys positioned on the left collarbone. The Panthers wear white pants with the white jerseys and silver pants are worn with the black jerseys. The side stripes on each set are light blue and come to a point at the base of the pants, basically an elongated triangle. The stripe – or triangle – is bordered in black. A small logo (facing forward like the helmet and sleeve logos) is superimposed over the stripe on the hips. Solid light blue socks adorn both uniform sets.

1996: One slight tweak is made to the black set only: The socks are changed from light blue to black.

1998: In the last game of the season (Week 17) for a game against the Colts at Indianapolis, the Panthers wear the white jersey over the silver pants. This combo has never been worn since.

2001: With the switch to the Reebok template, the shoulder stripes become equal in width. Previously the stripes on both jersey sets had a thicker middle light blue stripe with thinner outer stripes.

2002: The Panthers add an alternate jersey to the mix. A light blue jersey is added. It has a black collar, the numbers (torso and TV) are white with a thin black outline, the NOB is also white with black outline. The shoulder stripes are silver/black/silver and the panther sleeve logos outlined in white are on the sleeves. This jersey is strictly worn with the silver pants and black socks and is worn for a few games for each season here on in.

2003: The Panthers end the season with a run to Super Bowl XXXVIII (38) and wear the logo patch on their left collarbone area on the white set.

2004: Carolina wears a commemorative 10th season patch on the left collarbone area of all three jerseys for the season.

2008: As with all other teams, the Panthers wear a Gene Upshaw memorial patch on the left collarbone area for Week 1 of the season. The Panthers wear the light blue jersey for the game.

2011: The Panthers open the season with a 9/11 ribbon patch on the left collarbone of the white jersey, signifying the 10th Anniversary of the occurrence. All other teams who played on this specific date also wore the 9/11 ribbon patch.

2012: The Panthers make some slight changes to the panther head logo, notably light blue whiskers from white and the elimination of the white outline of the logo. This is represented on the helmet, sleeve and pant placements of the logo. For Weeks 14 and 15, the Panthers, as do their NFL brethren across the league wear a commemorative 50th Anniversary patch for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. This patch makes it onto the white jersey and black jersey. And, last but not least, in Week 10 (vs. the Denver Broncos) the Panthers stun the football community with a black over black ensemble. The black pants have same stripe pattern as with the white and silver pants, except the outer stripes are silver. The light blue socks are worn with the all black uni.

2014: A 20 Seasons patch is worn on the left collarbone for each of the three jerseys. To the dismay of some (many?), the all black combo is not worn this season.

2015: The all black ensemble makes a single appearance in Week 1 of the preseason, and then is never heard from again all season. In Week 12 on Thanksgiving Day as the visiting team in Dallas, the Panthers trot out the light blue jersey and also add – for the first time – light blue pants with the same format of striping as with the other three pairs of pants, the triangle colored black bordered in silver with the logo on each hip and light blue hose that extend all the way to the toes which are then covered with light blue cleats! This is part of the NFL’s “Color Rush” campaign, which sees several Thursday games with both teams squaring off in solid colors from neck to toe.

A Super DIY for Super Sunday

Got an e-mail from Steve Speicher , who is one of the many DIYers who follow Uni Watch. As is now a tradition, Steve DIY’ed a jersey for this year’s Super Bowl. I’ll let him tell you about it:

Hello again Paul and Uni Watch! The tradition continues with this year’s Super Bowl jersey.

This was another year where I don’t have strong feelings either way regarding the outcome, so, I stuck with the NFC. One day, maybe, I’ll make an AFC jersey!

I’m pretty pleased with the outcome. I thought the shoulder stripes would be a big pain, but, they ended up turning out OK. They’re a little messy under the sleeves, but, no one can see that anyway. The collar was much more of a pain – it’s very difficult to get good measurements on it and translate that into a printable graphic that fits well. The T-shirt I started with was seemingly stitched a bit off-center (not unexpected, as it was only $3!) but that translates into difficulty making a collar shape that fits. You’ll see that the back of the collar is a bit off. Obviously, I’m no Wafflebored, but whatever…I’ll take it.

The good news is that I didn’t screw up and put the sleeve logos on backwards like I did last year with the Lynch throwback!

I don’t really have anything new to report in terms of my process – it was basically the same as it’s been for the past few years. Just to reiterate, it’s pretty simple: measure the shirt, mock it up in Photoshop, construct vector-based images for the numerals and letters, grab some logos from Chris Creamer’s site, and size and lay everything out on a representation of the shirt. Then, once everything is sized relatively well, move all the graphics into files that are of printable size for the transfer paper, print, cut, iron, and you’re done! This year’s images (click to enlarge):

And one more…here’s a little family portrait going back to the 󈧏 Giants.

That one is a mess! I’ve definitely improved my methods since then.

Enjoy! And thank you as always for all the hard work you do for us readers of Uni Watch.

Uni Watch News Ticker

Baseball News: The immortal Babe Ruth’s birthday was yesterday, and here’s a picture of him with a birthday cake (and pre-Hugh Hefner robe), from Bruce Menard. … Eastern Michigan University is all set to unveil new road uniforms on Monday (h/t EMU Baseball). … Reader Anthony Auston asks, “Did you ever have success in crafting the Aesthetics shirt you posted about here? I’d really love to have the shirt you describe.” … Whoa — check out Babe Ruth in a Los Angeles Angels (of Los Angeles?) uniform that’s from the set of a 1927 movie (from Bruce Menard). … Arkansas-Monticello has a set of “Margarita Sunrise” jerseys (from Al Gruwell). … From the MLB Network special on the Expos, a fan in the stands with an official hat and an unofficial jersey (nice spot by Douglas Ford).

NFL News: Interesting beverage display at this Bowling Green, Ohio Walmart. Jared Sloan adds, “Odd they have the conference colors swapped.” … Here’s another one at a Target (from Zack Bennett). … And another in Wake Forest, North Carolina (via Interst8Forty4. Those last two look like Pepsi has a “standard” or “template” display they’re asking their distributors to set up. … Law enforcement officers have been getting special badges with Super Bowl themes the past few years. This year is no exception: Special issue badges for Super Bowl 50 for California Highway Patrol, Santa Clara PD, San Jose PD and San Francisco PD (from Rich Paloma). … With all the old Supe photos being displayed recently, Paul Dillon noticed the wide array of spacing on players who wore #11, particularly the difference between Joe Kapp and Scott Norwood. … Make My Cake in Harlem is most definitely ready for the Super Bowl (from Robert Brashear). … Check out this great vintage Tampa Bay Buccaneers clock that Sean Gilman found at a vintage shop in Tampa yesterday! … Here’s a neat commemorative Super Bowl poster (from Jordan Grimes). … Great photo spread from Sports Illustrated of their photos from every Super Bowl ever played (several have noted this).

College/HS/Other Football News: Check out this “pair of great MS helmets I ran across at a trophy case in the Haltom/Richland area in Texas” (from Peter Ponce). … Everyone knows Cam Newton has made the “dab” his signature move, but was he the first? “In no way am I supporting dabbing but I saw this in a Longhorn game in September which was prior to the craze created by Cam and the Panthers,” says Joey Breeland. … With all the helmet mashups & themes we have featured on here, I’m not sure if this one has been shown (apologies if it has): the WWE/NFL inspired helmets (from Scott Turney). … Reader Derek Linn thinks Grange Insurance may have sponsored this all-star game. … According to Jason Calvert, Kentucky might use its secondary logo on helmets next season. Here’s a bit more on that. … And people are still making with the funny over the new secondary logo.

Hockey News: On Friday night, the Ontario Reign did their pink in the rink thing, complete with pink jerseys and pink ice. … Question for the UW Hockey Wing: Does Philly wear these beauts every Saturday from RNs Funhouse. Tweeter Frank Stallone provided the answer. … Also from RNs Funhouse, “What is the significance of the shape of that alternate captain patch?” — I’m gonna guess since Pennsylvania is the Keystone State, and that’s in the shape of a keystone, that’s the significance. And sure enough. Our own Jimmer Vilk thinks the Flyers should have gone one step further and put TV numbers inside the keystone, a la the old Cleveland Barons. … The South Carolina Stingrays (an ECHL team) have some um, interesting Military Appreciation Night uniforms (from Gordon Cromer). … Really nice Lakeville North unis for Hockey Day Minnesota – outdoor HS Hockey in Duluth, MN (from jmmohr) – those have a real stripey Ottawa vibe. … The Tulsa Oilers went with pink sweaters yesterday (from Braden Dwyer). … Also doing the pink-in-the-rink thing were the Manchester Monarchs, who not only wore pink, but who also dyed the ice pink (from Cam Srotto). … The refs went with pink striped shirts in yesterday’s UConn vs. Merrimack game (from Mike Anthony).

NBA News: The Charlotte Hornets and Washington Wizards went color vs. color yesterday (screen shot by Benjamin Craig Lucas). … Also going color vs. color yesterday were the Chicago Bulls and Minnesota Timberwolves (from Tyler Mason). … Brandon Roy’s high school retired his jersey number (from Mike Chamernik). Also from Mike, the Thunder and Warriors went color vs. color, and both wore alternates. Here’s another view.

College Hoops News: Yesterday, the Pittsburgh Panthers did a BFBS blackout game (from Interst8Forty4) against Virginia. Here’s some pregame video (from James Gilbert). … Florida wore their orange uniforms for the first time this year vs. Kentucky (via Dave Doop). Here’s a look at the front (via Eric Goettling). And the pants (from Dave Doop). … Division III Keuka College will change its nickname from the “Wolfpack” to the “Wolves” after the 2015-16 academic year. Why? Because N.C. State threatened to sue (from Jeff Belcher). … Clemson at Virginia Tech was color vs color. A few interesting observations from Andrew Cosentino: 1) The Hokies elected to wear maroon at home. It was for their “Maroon Monsoon” theme. 2) Clemson elected to wear orange, making it look like the Hokies were playing a scrimmage. He adds, “Overall, this was a visually confusing game. It looked like the Hokies were playing themselves!” … A Kansas State player’s shoe fell apart during yesterday’s game against Oklahoma (from Mike Chamernik). … Western Kentucky had some sweet Sweet 16 throwbacks yesterday (via Adam Morrison Crying). … UTEP wore some “Texas Western” warmups yesterday (from Josh Claywell). UTEP used to be known Texas Western. During that game, UTEP was wearing “special Phil Knight Nikes designed to honor 50th anniversary of 󈨆 Championship” (via Aaron Rich). … Yesterday, Dayton went with gray unis (mentioned by several). Here’s more on that (from Patrick O’Neill). … Several color vs. color games yesterday, including UNC and Notre Dame(from Colby Jackson). Here’s another view (from Jason Williams). … URI and LaSalle had a gorgeous color vs. color game (via Chris). Here’s another look (from Eric O). … Long Beach State also played color vs. color vs. Cal State (from Aaron Cohn).

Soccer News: Oops? Did Manchester United reveal their new club logo in a trailer? (with thanks to Craig Ackers). The new logo seems to be a slight redesign of the well-known crest. The article has the trailer, together with pictures of the old and new Red Devils logo.

Grab Bag: Interesting Chicago logo mashup featuring the White Sox (from Brian Short). This one is very similar, only it features the Cubs (from Mike Nessen). … Tweeter Joe Bags thinks the new Kentucky logo mirrors the Dodge Challenger Hell Cat logo. … Here’s a look at the jerseys being worn by all 16 National Rugby League teams for the Auckland Nines tournament in New Zealand (from Graham Clayton). … “The Jaguares are a brand new team created to be Argentina’s first ever entrants into the top flight Super Rugby competition, and that excitement plus the fact that the shirts are pretty damn stunning has generated a massive amount of excitement among rugby fans,” says Josh Gardner. “It’s also notable because Nike doesn’t make many rugby shirts any more, but when they do it’s generally something pretty cool.”

And there you have it — hope you enjoyed the annual Super Bowl uni histories (and a big huge thanks, again, to Timmy Brulia). Everyone enjoy the game today — hopefully you can astound everyone at your Supe party with your vast knowledge of the unis and histories of both teams. You’ll either be the hit of your gathering, or the guy/gal that everyone wants to tie to a chair and put duct tape over your mouth. Either way, you’ll be that guy. If they get itâ„¢, that’s a very good thing.

“That has to be Jim Vilk’s least favorite basketball game of all time. We have ‘why do you look like Detroit?’ navy with wine numbers against the ‘how and why did Red Auerbach sign off on these?’ green with black trim and numbers. Color palette special? Nope. More like Prince of Darkness.”


Watch the video: Stretching for Splits (June 2022).


Comments:

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  4. Dorrel

    What words... super, an excellent idea

  5. Phorcys

    It is interesting. Can you tell me where I can find more information on this issue?



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